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By Charles Curkindec December 26, 2014

Reposted from http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/28/nyregion/iggy-lou-joey-and-danny.html

This month, a private screening was held for a rough cut of “Danny Says,” a documentary about the New York rock music legend Danny Fields. The theater was full of old friends of Danny’s and potential investors, but Mr. Fields was not in attendance.

Afterward, the director, Brendan Toller, who hopes to debut the film in March at the South by Southwest Festival in Austin, Tex., answered questions from the audience. The actor John Cameron Mitchell, who in the film refers to Mr. Fields as a “handmaiden to the gods,” asked if Mr. Fields would ever see it.

Mr. Toller, he later confessed, had been dreading that question. He hesitated. “Well —— ” he said.

“I’m never seeing it,” Mr. Fields, 75, wryly declared a few days later, sipping some microwaved sake in the living room of his West Village apartment. The man who introduced Jim Morrison to Nico, Iggy Pop to the world, and cocaine to Iggy Pop, simply doesn’t want to. “That’s Brendan’s thing,” he said.

Danny’s thing — and he is known to people in the business as “Danny” — was music. For roughly two decades, Mr. Fields found himself at the center of a revolution. He broke into the industry working for Elektra Records, first doing publicity for the Doors, then signing both Iggy Pop’s band the Stooges and the MC5 (on the same day), which would ultimately lead to his managing the Ramones. You could make a convincing case that without Danny Fields, punk rock wouldn’t have happened.

“Danny Says,” which took Mr. Toller five years to make — and takes its name from a Ramones song about Mr. Fields — is dominated by Mr. Fields’s tremulous monotone voice-over. But though he may claim that “Danny Says” holds little interest for him, the source material of the movie, his obsessively cataloged archives, certainly does.

Mr. Fields inhabits a cramped apartment filled with more priceless art and artifacts than its few walls can accommodate. As a proudly gay and puckish music industry executive, photographer, D.J. and journalist, Mr. Fields has lived a life most textured, and he has been re-examining it as Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library, which recently acquired a portion of his archives, comes to collect it one box at a time.

Timothy Young, curator of modern books and manuscripts at the Beinecke, is very excited about the acquisition. “My colleagues looked at me in silence after I pitched them Danny’s archive,” Mr. Young said, affirming Mr. Fields’s renown even in academic circles. “It’s such important material of such an important person.

He also noted that the circumstances for the acquisition were strange. “It’s a new experience for me to work with someone who’s alive.”

Andy Warhol’s manager, the filmmaker Paul Morrissey, knew Mr. Fields well but lost track of him over the years. “Is he still alive?” Mr. Morrissey asked, over the phone. Mr. Morrissey, who was interviewed for “Danny Says,” recalled the many times Mr. Fields would stop by his office — what is referred to in popular culture as the Factory — with some friends in tow. “He was a really fun and intelligent guy,” Mr. Morrissey recalled. “I liked him a lot, but I never really knew what he did.”

Though it has been some time since Mr. Fields was influencing the culture, he is very much alive.

Today, Mr. Fields jokes that he doesn’t even like music, but then he’ll insist that it is the greatest of all the things that matter to him. He also considers himself an equally ardent cinephile — he speaks passionately of classics like “The Thief of Bagdad,” a Technicolor adventure from 1940 that still brings him to tears upon repeat viewings; its score, he says, is the first music he ever loved.

Mr. Fields likes to speak, and does it naturally, openly, and with great brio; it’s his talent. For stories, he’s an endless fount, with enough material to fill a few tomes. Those bites of oral tradition are his legacy. The people he knew, the things he saw, the places he has been: That is the gestalt of Danny Fields. They’re alive in his reminiscences, and in the surfeit of audio recordings, photographs, paintings, books and magazines he lives among.

Danny Fields took the photo for the Ramones 1977 album, Rocket to Russia. Credit Joshua Bright for The New York Times

Danny Fields took the photo for the Ramones 1977 album, Rocket to Russia. Credit Joshua Bright for The New York Times

Born Daniel Feinberg in Queens in 1939, Mr. Fields was raised Jewish and is the older of two children. He was a bright kid, graduating from high school at 15, then the University of Pennsylvania at 19, and then dropping out of Harvard Law at 20. “I didn’t want to be a lawyer,” he said. “I thought Harvard was where all the beautiful boys went.”

After Harvard, he moved back to New York and became a regular at the San Remo Cafe in Greenwich Village, where he befriended fellow patrons like Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg and Edward Albee.

Though he found himself surrounded by artists, his own talent was publicizing them. He became an editor at the teen magazine Datebook, where during a fabulously short tenure he managed to ignite controversy by publishing a quote from a 1966 interview by Maureen Cleave with John Lennon who had humbly declared that his band at the time, the Beatles, was more popular than Jesus Christ. (In “Danny Says,” it is asserted that Mr. Fields’s decision led to the band’s eventual dissolution.) He certainly had a yen for stirring the pot. When speaking about his mission statement at Datebook, he said: “I wanted to introduce the Velvet Underground to girls aged 11 to 14.”

From Datebook, he was hired by Elektra Records, which marked a turning point in his career — the observer became a participant.

Mr. Fields surrounds himself with mementos from his life. Some he is parting with now, and the rest he is keeping until he shuffles off: art by the notorious cartoonist Mike Diana, who was convicted of obscenity; hundreds of black-and-white photographs — shots by him and of him and his old coterie including Warhol, John Waters’s drag collaborator Divine, David Bowie and Paul McCartney.

Danny Fields with Nico, photographed by Linda McCartney. Credit Courtesy of the Danny Fields Archives

Danny Fields with Nico, photographed by Linda McCartney. Credit Courtesy of the Danny Fields Archives

“I’m so happy my things are getting a better place to live,” Mr. Fields said.

In January, his first shipment went out to the Beinecke. It was made up of materials largely relating to the Ramones. The second installment, which was collected in July, was mostly audio recordings newly digitized from cassettes, a task that Mr. Fields personally oversaw and underwrote.

The recordings are of his conversations with people he knew or encountered, like Leonard Cohen, whom Mr. Fields took to the Chelsea Hotel to meet some of its tenants, including Edie Sedgwick. “He called me his Virgil,” recalled Mr. Fields, referring to his role as a guide through hell in Dante’s “Inferno.”

The big names he recorded have salience for a lot of music fanatics, but for Mr. Fields, it’s his conversations with the theater critic Donald Lyons (whose estate was also acquired by the Beinecke) and Steve Paul, who owned the Scene (the nightclub where Jimi Hendrix played his first New York show), that he considers highlights of his collection. “Everyone’s heard Lou Reed,” Mr. Fields said, “but no one has tape of Donald screaming, and Steve just being cosmically wonderful.”

Also part of his archives, which he hopes Mr. Young of the Beinecke will acquire, is his pornography: Polaroids of hustlers and videocassettes of blue movies he directed. “I have drawers full of mini-videocassettes of homemade porn,” Mr. Fields said. He described them as fabulous. So far, Yale has not disclosed exactly how much of the pornography it will be taking.

It has been a somber year for Mr. Fields, with the deaths of the punk photographer Leee Black Childers; Arturo Vega, designer of the Ramones’ logo; the poet Rene Ricard; and Tommy Ramone, the original Ramones drummer.

Mr. Fields wistfully acknowledged, “I got more than I deserved,” referring to a career as an important operator in the history of rock ’n’ roll. “I never put my stamp on anything,” he said. “I’ve tried, but never succeeded. I was just a witness.” One could get the impression that Mr. Fields’s self-deprecation belies how he truly feels about himself.

As he takes stock of a storied, tumultuous past, he makes his expectations for the future perfectly clear: He wants more great bands and people in his life to fall in love with. “That’s ‘The Thief of Bagdad,’ ” Mr. Fields said. “To be in love with the princess. Or the prince.”

A version of this article appears in print on December 28, 2014, on page MB1 of the New York edition with the headline: Iggy, Lou, Joey — and Danny.

HorizonVU Music is proud to have donated to the “Danny Says” project.


Women of Substance Radio has been on the air for 4 years. We broadcast 24/7 on the Live365 Network and iTunes Radio garnering fans from all over the world. WOSRadio plays the BEST female artists, both label and Indie, in all genres. We hand-pick all of our music starting with icons of the past like Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Tracy Chapman, Mariah Carey, No Doubt, Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Jewel, Michelle Branch, Kelly Clarkson, Sara Bareilles, Colbie Caillat, Adele, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse, Feist, Christina Perri and so many more. Women of Substance take submissions from Indies and our review board selects only the best quality artists and songs that can stand up next to the forementioned superstars. Indie artists we have chosen early in their career have gone on to be Top 24 on American Idol, win second place on the Bravo show Platinum Hit, and one artist is currently a chosen contestant on NBC’s The Voice.



Women Of Substance Radio Top 20 Tracks

1. I Am Yours duet w Evan Prewitt
Tivoli Skye

Tivoli Skye

Tivoli Skye

2. Promise
Tivoli Skye

3. Our Hearts Are One
Tivoli Skye

4. Room For Me
Nikki Nash

5.Walmart Killed Main Street
Voodoo Highway

6. Silent Night
Jenny Van Alstyne

7. Guardian Angel
Susan Sacco (Writers Jacqueline Cuba Norkin & Susan Sacco)

8. Spinning
Liv Margaret

9. Show Me What You Got
Ces Indie

10. I Wanna Love Tonight
Aeona

11. Merry Memories
Fue

12. I Still Feel You
Aeona

13. Winter’s Eve
Fue

14. Abba Father
Deborah Wargnier

15. Call Me Baby
Rece Jay

16. Christmastime
Norvald Kjenstad

17. What do I get Him for Christma
Hart Brothers (feat. Denise Hart)

18. Winter Time in NYC
Wishing on Stars

19. One More Christmas
Hollywood & Mars (writer Nitanee Paris)

20. Wade In Your Mercy
Deborah Wargnier


Amanda Thorpe Bewitches the American Songbook

By Tom Semioli, TV news writer, journalist, and bassist

Reposted from Huffpost Arts & Culture http://www.huffingtonpost.com/tom-semioli/amanda-thorpe-bewitches-t_b_6456958.html

17 January 2015

Amanda Thorpe_Bewitching

“Yip wrote about universal human emotions and conditions, his lyrics have remained remarkably relevant. In every day and age we have had dreamers, lovers and soul searchers. But Yip was also a human rights activist and he viewed his songs as more than mere entertainment. Theodore Taylor – in a biography about composer Jule Styne – said Yip was often ‘caught at the art of sneaking social messages into his lyrics.’ Per Yip, ‘I am a rebel by birth, I contest anything that is unjust, that causes suffering in humanity. My feelings about that are so strong; I don’t think I could live with myself if I weren’t honest.”

Perhaps if Edgar Yipsel “Yip” Harburg had plugged in an electric guitar at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965, we’d revere his canon as much as we do the works of Robert Allen Zimmerman. Nowadays the name of this iconic pop lyricist born Isidore Hochberg on New York’s Lower East Side in the year 1896 is mostly known among nostalgia buffs and theater musos, but not the masses. Yet Mr. Harburg was a “Bob Dylan” of his era – assuming a fresh new identity and penning lyrics to such classics as “Brother Can You Spare a Dime?” all the songs in The Wizard of Oz including “Over The Rainbow,” “Old Devil Moon,” “April in Paris,” and “It’s Only a Paper Moon,” among many others, which deftly merged romance, clever observations of the human and social condition, and politics into a timeless libretto. Somehow Yip has evaded the perpetual hosannas routinely afforded his contemporaries Cole Porter, Lorenz Hart, and Johnny Mercer.

Leave it to a British artist to once again to remind us Yanks of a neglected American musical treasure through an album before and after its time: Amanda Thorpe’s Bewitching Me. Ms. Thorpe, born in Derby, England, and currently residing in Paris, forged an impressive career among New York City’s indie pop royalty over the past two decades, releasing several collections under her own name, and as a member of the highly acclaimed Bedsit Poets with Edward Rogers and Mac Randall (who guests on one track), among other collaborations. As a recording artist, performer, and composer, Ms. Thorpe’s artistry traverses folk, rock, jazz, cabaret, and every conceivable variation thereof.

Amanda’s connection to the Harburg family essentially prompted the realization of Bewitching Me. “I had been working with Deena Rosenberg (Yip’s daughter-in-law via her marriage to Ernie Harburg) for a couple of years on various musical theater and tutoring projects” she recalls. “We had a meeting at DeRoberti’s old Italian bakery on 1st Avenue – which has since sadly closed after 100 years – for a holiday drink and to discuss future plans. As we supped on our favorite warm beverage and nibbled on select pastries, I suppose it was quite natural for Ernie, who is a champion of his father’s work, to suggest my considering covering some of Yip’s catalog…I laughed it off initially, I associated Yip with Broadway show tunes.”

Intrigued by the challenge, Amanda forged ahead with the project. The Harburgs opened their vast Yip archives to Ms. Thorpe – providing numerous recordings and compositions grouped by eras and various categories: moon songs, love songs, troubled love songs, rainbow songs, social songs, and then some. “One of the most important things for me was not to record an album that sounded like me singing jazz standards. Yip seemed dedicated to the exploration and joy of language – he had countless notebooks in which he would capture all types of phrases or words, and he would often rework a concept or a lyric approach multiple times and in different songs. He sounded like a fascinating man and a force of nature, so passionate and full of life and ideas. I imagine he saw the world in 3D Technicolor even before the Wizard of Oz! He could dig so deep into emotions and sprinkle them so lightly into lyrical vignettes. His mastery of words is pretty intimidating…”

By way of its modern Americana veneer, Bewitching Me emerges as a cousin to the recent commercially popular and critically acclaimed Lost On The River (2014) collection: an extraordinary archival based endeavor produced by T Bone Burnett which set new music to a recently recovered cache of hand-written Bob Dylan lyrics circa 1966-67. Burnett amassed an all-star ensemble dubbed The New Basement Tapes which features Elvis Costello, Rhiannon Giddons (Carolina Chocolate Drops), Taylor Goldsmith (Dawes), Jim James (My Morning Jacket), and Marcus Mumford (Mumford & Sons), among others, to complete Dylan’s mid-life musings with a contemporary resonance.


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

I’m back for a new edition of the American Festival Tours in 2015. Dates to note in your diaries are 3, 4 and 5 July.

This annual event offers several talents from America to Canada as usual. The American Tours Festival is in the exhibition center of the City of Tours, and for this, two gigantic halls open their doors for you to experience the time of the 50’s and 60’s. Stands and vintage shops of all kinds await you. You will also have the opportunity to style your hair like the days of rock’n'roll. You will also find great cars.

Miss Mary Ann & The Ragtime Wranglers

Miss Mary Ann

Howlin Jaws Trio

Howlin Jaws Trio

This is also marks the 50’s heyday – it’s about the music! And this year, the organizers are preparing for you a very nice program starting with a stellar roster of artists like Miss Mary Ann & The Ragtime Wranglers, “Jaws Howlin ‘for the love of Doo Wop “Ol Bry” without forgetting the legendary Lloyd Price! The team of Nashville News has seen it produced live at the mega festival Viva Las Vegas in Las Vegas, Nevada!

Lloyd Price

Lloyd Price

Lloyd Price is famous thanks to her big hits like “Persolality”, “Stagger Lee” and the song “Lawdy Miss Clawdy” endorsed by king Elvis Presley and many others. Lloyd is a charismatic and sympathetic character displaying a permanent smile that I suggest will bring cheer to each on stage move! Next – country music do not panic! You will also be served.

Kevin Buckley

Kevin Buckley

The French country artist Kevin Buckley will be present to offer you concerts throughout the day and make you dance on the big wooden floors planned for the delight of dancers! Many shops and restaurants will be on hand as well as a Western camp with teepees, contributing to a rodeo! But the American Tours Festival is also very popular because of its motorcycle colony, and in particular, Harley Davidson. Yes! The great American brand is new partner of the American Festival Tours! It’s not all a novelty to be added to all these activities. Fifteen unusual vehicles will also be in Tours, for a Pulling Tractor show.

For those who do not know this “racing” it involves tractor engines on vitamins such the size of an aircraft engine, allowing the tractor to reach record speeds in a short distance causing an infernal noise! So plan to bring your helmets!

Franck Boucheraud

Franck Boucheraud

Now, go to Canada with Franck Boucheraud, who is none other than the programmer of the Canadian Music Night evening. You will have the privilege to applaud the songwiter and talented performer, Aaron Pritchett and female duet “One More Girl.”

One More Girl

One More Girl

These two talented artists are sisters, both actresses and singers. Carly and Britt McKillip, began their music career in 2008 with a debut album released in 2009 titled “Big Sky”. A second album is in preparation. The first track is called “Drunk Heart” soon to be discovered in Nashville News!

Continuing with the program of the American Festival Tours! Aaron Pritchett – you will find this cowboy at the Canadian Music Night Saturday, July 4th! Aaron is from Vancouver, Canada and has six albums to his credit including one expected very soon! For more information stay tuned and listen to the News Nashville !! More information http://www.americantoursfestival.com/

Aaron Pritchett

Aaron Pritchett


Women of Substance Radio has been on the air for 4 years. We broadcast 24/7 on the Live365 Network and iTunes Radio garnering fans from all over the world. WOSRadio plays the BEST female artists, both label and Indie, in all genres. We hand-pick all of our music starting with icons of the past like Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Tracy Chapman, Mariah Carey, No Doubt, Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Jewel, Michelle Branch, Kelly Clarkson, Sara Bareilles, Colbie Caillat, Adele, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse, Feist, Christina Perri and so many more. Women of Substance take submissions from Indies and our review board selects only the best quality artists and songs that can stand up next to the forementioned superstars. Indie artists we have chosen early in their career have gone on to be Top 24 on American Idol, win second place on the Bravo show Platinum Hit, and one artist is currently a chosen contestant on NBC’s The Voice.



Women Of Substance Radio Top 20 Tracks

1. Tivoli Skye – Promise

Tivoli is a 2013 Indie Music Channel Award winner and she has been honored for her courage in “standing up for what is right” and forming her own awareness/advocacy event with local government officials, organizations, and musicians called “Stand up & stand out! – Positive Role Models against bullying, abuse and for suicide prevention/Awareness”.

2. Tivoli Skye – Our Hearts Are One

3. Jenny Van Alstyne – Love Me Tender

4. Tivoli Skye – I Am Yours duet w Evan Prewitt

5. Nikki Nash – Room For Me

6. Voodoo Highway _ Walmart Killed Main Street

7. FUE – Go On

8. Deborah Wargnier – Wade In Your Mercy

9. Casey Shreidber – If You Were Mine

10. CONTINUUM – Divorce Looks Good On You

11. Sandy Rapp – Ain’t Nobody Home

12. Jennifer Jones – Tell Me

13. Nadia Rae (writer Kevin Frederick Byrne) – Breakin’ Out

14. Van Wild – Hey Old Man

15. Lady Ginseng – Immortal

16. Jenna Marotta – Never Forget

17. Partners ‘n Crimel feat Tapia Corel – Enough!

18. Shirley Green – 1994

19. Melissa Fielding – Lost & Found

20. Melissa Schott – Closer To Winter


Lively tunes for a worthy cause

Dec 22, 2014 – Saumya Bhatia

Reposted from The Asian Age http://www.asianage.com/people/lively-tunes-worthy-cause-222

Pop singer Sagarika Deb is in news for right reasons. She will be honoured with the International Women Achievers Awards (IWAA) in Canada in March 2015 for her contributions to music and her humanitarian works. What makes this achievement special is that Sagarika is the first Indian to be honoured with this award in the IWAA Role Model category.

Sagarika will perform her song Shine a light, which was inspired by the brutal gang rape of 2012 at the awards ceremony. Upon asking what does this recognition means to her, Sagarika says, “To know that I am the first ever Indian to receive this award feels on top of the world. I started my career with an experiment with no idea where I will lead. It was only a strong will to put the music in me in front of people. From an amateur in the music business to now receiving an international award in less than three years means a lot to me.”
Sagarika is recipient of several awards such as, Rajiv Gandhi Excellence Award, Indian Women Role Model Award, Young Achiever Award and many more. Talking about how the 2012 incident inspired the song and how situation remains grim even today, Sagarika says, “Each and every girl not only in India but in the entire world would like to stop the tragic incidences happening against them. My team members and I wanted to do our part and it was only through music we could show what we felt. We started discussing the idea and coincidentally, at that moment, I received a message from Dr Kiran Bedi’s NGO Navjyoti India Foundation to be a part of their women empowerment campaign against eve teasing. Navjyoti ki oar (the Hindi version of Shine a light)) was written specifically for them to be used as the anthem for the campaign. We made the song in Hindi and English so that it can touch the hearts of not only people living in India but the English speaking countries as well. Mellina Barnett and Mellina Barnett both from the UK wrote the lyrics and composed music respectively for the project.”

She adds, “It’s a pity that even today women don’t feel safe. As a young girl residing in Delhi, my parents are scared to let me go out alone. Just with the hope of throwing some light on the plight of women not only in India but everywhere, we have composed the song. It was a pleasant surprise when two French filmmakers Casandra Prerost and Bruno Acard contacted my manager to make a music video of the songs. It proves the desire for a change was burning in the hearts of people across the world. We shot the music video extensively in many parts of Delhi. It was showcased in European Independent Film Festival with much appreciation. Shine a light is an expression of hope and change. It is about kindness and peace, and not rage and anger. President of IWAA, Blair Brown asked me to perform the song during the award ceremony so that more people can join hands in bringing a change in their countries.”

Sagarika belongs to a musical family. Her mother and sister are brilliant singers, she points out and rightly so, her mother is her inspiration. “Ever since I was growing up I saw my mother performing on stage and singing and then I started joining both my mother and sister on stage. My connection with music started at around two and half years of age. Since then there was no looking back. I always knew I will be a performer and stage is where I belong.”

Sagarika is also the creator of world’s first Internet girl band Wild Blossoms, upon asking how did it come together, she replies, “I have always had immense interest in Internet and social media, and I am using these channels to share not only my music, but also talk about women’s empowerment and animal rights. Wild Blossoms was an experiment which will always be very close to my heart, although now I am concentrating on evolving as a solo artist.”

Sagarika will soon be seen in a Punjabi music video and a short film One Wrong Step. “It is a short film produced and directed by the Anhad Studios. It is made under the direction of Ravindra Rajawat and is made for spreading a message and show the world how the young girls are manipulated, even at the hands of their known people and elders. As for the Punjabi video, I am acting and not singing in the video.”

She is presently working on her first solo album and collaborating with songwriters and lyricists from Europe and USA. “One of the songs from the album is already recorded and I am excited for its release, as this may be the first time anyone is making a solo album with people from so many different parts of the world, without even meeting any of them in person. It’s a lengthy process since all of us live in a different time zone and meet only on the Internet.”


Header_DenigrataA Lecturer in Popular Music at a British Higher Education institution, Denigrata Herself is undertaking her PhD in women in extreme metal. She is also the front woman/guitarist in Denigrata, an experimental black metal collective. Denigrata have coined the term noir concrête for their music, meaning the avant-garde dark noise initiated by Pierre Schaeffer and Karlheinz Stockhausen finds a different rhizomatic existence within their contemporary black metal performance space.

Denigrata Herself is a gender theorist whose research and publications to date focus on body performativity, reclamation of female space, tattooing, graphic novels, death metal and black metal. She is part of the International Society for the Study of Metal Music (ISMMS) and sits on various academic and equal rights boards in the UK.

For over a decade she was a lead guitarist in British death metal bands, she was signed to and worked for various independent record labels and now devotes her time to lecturing, researching and performing. She is choir master for her departmental chamber choir and presents annual post-modern renderings of canonical classical pieces with her choir, a string quartet, a contemporary band and Ableton performers.

Blog December 2014
Northern Darkness Calling: screaming into the void

Metal thrives through local communities and culture, drawing its performers, bloggers, promoters and audience from local sources, from people moved by the music who want to add and enliven their scene through their contribution. So, when people who put great thought, time and effort in to doing this are not supported by their communities, it seems like a miserable dislocation of priorities.

I am speaking here of the existence of zines; not webzines, not a social media imitation of what magazines used to be, a ghost that haunts the online space if you will, but an actual, hard copy analogue artefact. To leaf through the personally crafted and often hard-sought interviews, the artwork and the manner in which they have been lovingly crafted, offers something special.

As music becomes ever more assimilated into the digital make-believe that passes for contemporary existence, the blatant intangibility of culture grows and replicates and ceases to occupy space in the real world. A metal zine that you pay a couple of quid for, that you impatiently wait for to arrive in the post, that you cannot wait to unwrap and engage with, means something – it is real. Without getting embroiled into a Lacanian dialectic as whether anything is in fact, real (something I actually theoretically engage with) the simple fact that I can hold the zine in my hands, that it has been created, not by some megacorporation but by individuals who believe in the music rather than returned revenue, helps to reaffirm my existence in the real world. If I was to read it online, the experience would be a divorced, separated and somehow distanced ontology that doesn’t fulfil what it purports to represent. Don’t get me wrong, I love reading online sources as much as the next person, but owning a copy, knowing it is in my collection, means I get to engage with the artistic process of the zine on my own terms. I feel like I am part of it, the art object. Online, I do not feel like I am part of anything, I am just another faceless disembodied entity screaming into the void…

I am a particular fan and supporter of Northern Darkness zine. Hailing from the north of England and now in its second printing, with another one scheduled for the New Year, this has been an example of a zine that makes me deeply happy. It offers you something rare – personal effort for something that is loved: extreme metal. Zines are not created or maintained for money, unlike music magazines, their existence is solely down to a few committed writers, musicians and artists who want to do it. I have blogged about the significance and importance of intent before and yet again, it becomes a significant talking point. The desire to want to do something artistic, for your community, that everyone can enjoy, should be supported and when it isn’t, something in me becomes equally riled and disappointed.

The importance of promotion to cottage industries cannot be overstated – you need to get the word out that this is what you are putting your effort into and, much like unsigned bands, social media is a logical (albeit problematic) way of doing this. However, it is always important to know your demographic so when this has been identified and established, promoting on peoples pages should not be a problem. Yet to some it is and I struggle to analyse why.

You are into extreme metal yes? You clearly identify and like all the relevant pages on Facebook that signify that you are a member of this community yet you get pissy when people want to share what they are doing, after all isn’t this what social media is for…. And I’m not talking about the Facebook ‘over-sharers’ that, with the power of one status, suck you into their intolerable arguments or dinner pictures, Lord knows there are enough of them. I’m talking of once or twice a month posts that promote the zine. Hardly dominating your newsfeed is it. But to then be a dick about it, shows a nasty element of a growing paradigm of online intolerance.

Yes, the metal scene is really suffering at the hands of that at the moment. As ‘metal-gate’ would have you believe various quite frankly, bigoted fuckwits thinking their positions in bands automatically legitimises their backwards ideologies, but supporting a zine should not be part of a general closed-minded attitude that fails to help maintain a vibrant cultural scene. In fact, it acts as a direct counter to instances such as ‘metal-gate’ because it facilitates solidarity; focus on the actual music, instead of giving space to racist and sexist idiots who think it is ok to behave like a cunt. The online space has given them too much already.

The creators of the zine have suffered some disappointing attitudes and comments from, what I have always thought of, as an open-minded and supportive scene. I would really hate to think I was wrong and I refuse to be disheartened because of the few closed minded individuals who seem to forget that when you are mean and nasty online, you are in fact still talking to a human being. What does this say about our community?! That we are unwilling to support fellow creative people in their efforts? That we are not interested in new interviews and album reviews or live performances? Then I have to ask this, what the fuck are you even doing in extreme metal?! Because these are precisely the reasons our communities exist in the first place. We should applaud those willing to give of their free time, for no wages, their desire to offer us something real, something tangible. Who else would bother?

This is actually part of a wider discourse that extends to the support of local bands, local venues, local promoters and independent record labels. If we do not support our cultural communities’ efforts then there is a very simple result – there won’t be any. So before you get all snippy when someone promotes on your page, just think twice before you put your contemptuous fingers to the keyboard: question your response before you hit send, you may be affecting the growth of your scene.

Comments are welcome. Denigrata Herself can be contacted at denigrataherself@horizonvumusic.com


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

This week I present a female duo making for serious talk. This is Madisson Marlow from the city of Santa Fe, Texas and Taylor Dye who comes straight from the town of Ada, Oklahoma. They are known today as Maddie & Tae . These two childhood friends have always loved country music, especially the Dixie Chicks. One day Tae wrote a song to encourage Maddie to leave school and go to the music city, Nashville, to devote herself entirely to music.

The dream became reality in 2013. Maddie & Tae landed in Nashville and knocked on the door of one of the biggest labels in Nashville: Big Machine Records. Seeing their talent and potential of their live performance, the big boss of the label, Scott Borchetta offered them a deal to sign on ” Dot Records” a sub label Big Machine . In July 2014, they finally arrived on-air radio with the title “Girl In A Country Song” co-written by the excellent songwiter Aaron Sherz and produced by guitarist Dan Huff! Meanwhile, the single was played and replayed on the country rado at the national level.

Now, Maddie & Tae are number 1 on the mediabase charts with their first single “Girl In A Country Song”. This song sounds very “Bro -Country” an abbreviated form of “Brother Country “,a new term which means in essence :” Country mix of instruments such as mandolin or banjo and singing to the sounds of Hip Hop”. To give you a concrete example go to Florida Georgia Line! Anyway, it’s unfortunate to say, but now the US hears more of that Hip Hop flavor country or ” Country Bro ” text. Some some songs are country-inspired instrumentation and rhythm-the sound is Pop/Hip Hop . The Maddie & Tae single is taken from their self-titled debut album released on 4 November. So are you more or country Bro Country ?


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

The vocal quartet Little Big Town, no doesn’t in its crazy and unbelievable rise to the heights of glory. They are once again in first place of mediabase ranking No. 1 hit country in the USA. .. and Canada with the single “Day Drinkin’ “. This is the first single from their sixth studio album “Pain Killer” which is certainly the most Pop of all. In any case, even if they abandoned the Country Music Crossover, their group continuesto climb at all the levels! I remind you that this year, Litte Big Town again won the award for Best Group of the Year at the 48th CMA Awards.


Women of Substance Radio has been on the air for 4 years. We broadcast 24/7 on the Live365 Network and iTunes Radio garnering fans from all over the world. WOSRadio plays the BEST female artists, both label and Indie, in all genres. We hand-pick all of our music starting with icons of the past like Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Tracy Chapman, Mariah Carey, No Doubt, Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Jewel, Michelle Branch, Kelly Clarkson, Sara Bareilles, Colbie Caillat, Adele, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse, Feist, Christina Perri and so many more. Women of Substance take submissions from Indies and our review board selects only the best quality artists and songs that can stand up next to the forementioned superstars. Indie artists we have chosen early in their career have gone on to be Top 24 on American Idol, win second place on the Bravo show Platinum Hit, and one artist is currently a chosen contestant on NBC’s The Voice.



Women Of Substance Radio Top 20 Tracks

1. Nikki Nash – Room For Me

Nikki NashNikki grew up in Skokie to German Jewish immigrant parents; writing songs at 7; singing at banquet dinners at 9. Chess Records signed her at 14.She won the Chicago’s Everything Music Guide Songwriting Contest in ‘85. In 2000 Poetry.com put her poem I COULD JUST AS EASILY BE A POTATO in their anthology.Her music is DOWNHOME AUTHENTIC KNEE SLAPPING TOE TAPPING BOUNCY FEEL GOOD MUSIC that leaves everyone of all ages SMILING & FEELING GOOD! LIKE A HAPPY CHILD AGAIN!

2. Tivoli Skye – I Am Yours

3. Tivoli Skye – Our Hearts Are One

4. Jenny Van Alstyne – Don’t It Make My Brown Eyes Blue (cover)

5. Jenny Van Alstyne – Time After Time (cover)

6. Voodoo Highway – Walmart Killed Mainstreet

7. Jenny Van Alstyne – Love Me Tender (cover)

8. FUE – Go On

9. Jennifer Jones – Tell Me

10. PJ Brunson – Cold Tennessee Rain

11. Deborah Wargnier – Wade In Your Mercy

12. Deborah Wargnier – Abba Father

13. Jenna Laurise – Defying The Odds

14. PJ Brunson – Free To Choose

15. FUE – Arms (Christina Perri Cover)

16. Mary Kay Maas – Barbie Can’t Stand Up

17. Sara Kerr – There’s No Easy Way

18. Deborah Wargnier – Circle Game (cover)

19. Rehya Stevens – Vintage Love

20. Kelly Rae Burton – Freeze You


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