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Women of Substance Radio has been on the air for 4 years. We broadcast 24/7 on the Live365 Network and iTunes Radio garnering fans from all over the world. WOSRadio plays the BEST female artists, both label and Indie, in all genres. We hand-pick all of our music starting with icons of the past like Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Tracy Chapman, Mariah Carey, No Doubt, Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Jewel, Michelle Branch, Kelly Clarkson, Sara Bareilles, Colbie Caillat, Adele, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse, Feist, Christina Perri and so many more. Women of Substance take submissions from Indies and our review board selects only the best quality artists and songs that can stand up next to the forementioned superstars. Indie artists we have chosen early in their career have gone on to be Top 24 on American Idol, win second place on the Bravo show Platinum Hit, and one artist is currently a chosen contestant on NBC’s The Voice.



Women Of Substance Radio Top 20 Tracks

1. Tivoli Skye – Our Hearts Are One

Tivoli is a 2013 Indie Music Channel Award winner and she has been honored for her courage in “standing up for what is right” and forming her own awareness/advocacy event with local government officials, organizations, and musicians called “Stand up & stand out! – Positive Role Models against bullying, abuse and for suicide prevention/Awareness”.

2. Tivoli Skye – I Am Yours

3. Nikki Nash – Room For Me

4. Mary Kay Maas – Barbie Can’t Stand Up

5. Rece Jay – The Trump

6. PJ Brunson – Free To Choose

7. Voodoo Highway – Walmart Killed Mainstreet

8. Jennifer Jones – Tell Me

9. FUE – Go On

10. Randi Fay – Falling

11. Jenny Van Alstyne – Angel (Sarah McLachlan Cover)

12. FUE – Arms (Christina Perri Cover)

13. Jenna Laurise – You Are My Happy

14. Jen Haugland – Where I Am

15. Kiyomi – Fields Of Gold (Sting Cover)

16. Tandem Rain -Hell To Pay

17. Che-Val – My Beat

18. ces Music – Wicked Game

19. Alanna – Light In Your Eyes (Sheryl Crow Cover)

20. Christine DeMeo – Wear You Down


Ösp Eldjárn

Ösp Eldjárn

Ösp Eldjárn grew up in the beautiful valley of Svarfaðardalur, Iceland with her musical family. Together they would play folk and traditional music and perform professionally together across the country. In 2010, along with her brother and close friends, they took to the stage as a band called ‘Brother Grass’. The folk/americana/blue grass group released two albums together and have gained a loyal following in Iceland and other countries and have had airplay on BBC3 Radio. After studying jazz singing, Ösp moved to the city of London in the autumn of 2011 to pursue a solo career and to broaden her musical direction. Inspired by the vocals of Ella Fitzgerald, the stories of Joni Mitchell and by her own folky roots, she began to write her own original material and is currently working on interesting collaborations with numerous up and coming artists.

HVUM: Ösp it’s great to have you with us. We know a little bit about you from our earlier conversation, but tells us about your background. How did you first become interested in music and pursuing a career in music? Were your parents the primary influence?

OE: Yes, my parents were a big influence. I grew up in a very musical household, my parents were in an a capella quartet for many years so I would grow up listening to them singing songs in beautiful harmonies. I guess that is why I’m so drawn to harmonies and find that it comes quite natural to me. Whenever my extended family comes together, we sing and play the guitar. My parents perform a lot together, where my dad plays the guitar and my mom sings. My mother is also a published solo artist and she is a great inspiration and has always been my number one fan.

HVUM: Did you receive formal training along the way and did you have any teachers or mentors that inspired you to become a professional musician?

OE: I started singing lessons at 18, where I studied classical singing. I did that for 3 years, but when I moved to Reykjavík I soon realized that my passion was not within the classical genre. I started studying jazz at FÍH and did that for another 3 years. I’ve been very lucky to have had many good and inspiring teachers. One in particular, Kristjana Stefánsdóttir, who is one of Iceland’s best jazz singers, has been a great support, even after I moved to London. She made me promise her that I would not start teaching, but that I would pursue my career as a singer, ‘cause that’s what I was meant to be, a performer. Then she added, laughing, that I could teach when I was old.

HVUM: So tell us about the journey from Iceland to London. What motivated you to go to London instead of (say) New York?

OE: Well I’ve always wanted to try to live and study in England. But somehow I always planned on studying in Scandinavia. I guess one of the main reasons for that was that it is very expensive to study in the UK and USA, especially if you are from Iceland. But somehow, after a very spontaneous decision caused by a late night, red wine infused phone conversation with my cousin, who lives in London, I ended up in an audition and got into a school in London! And now, three years later I’m still not done with this city. But New York is still very much in the picture.

HVUM: You have studied at the prestigious Institute for Contemporary Music Performance in London http://icmp.co.uk/. Tell us about your work at ICMP.

OE: I actually studied at another college first, London Centre of Contemporary Music. I was there for 2 years in a B.Mus course, but decided to move to ICMP for the last year and got into the 3rd year of a B.A course in Creative Musicianship. It was a very good decision for me and the direction I’m going with my music. I met some amazing and inspiring teachers there, and because of them, I ended up doing a final performance with my original music, that had until that day only been performed within the four walls of my bedroom.
I also made a short documentary about my home and my family. It was some sort of an attempt to explain me as a musician, because I think that where you are from must have a big impact on what you create later on. At least it does for me.

HVUM: We’ve listened to your music posted on SoundCloud https://soundcloud.com/osp-eldjarn. You have a very distinct, strong and melodious voice. You perform a range of genres from jazz, to folk to bluegrass, for example. In fact, you have been in a number of bands including “Brother Grass”.

Tell us about your preferences for different genres of music and your involvement with bands.

OE: I think it is important, especially as a songwriter to be open for different kind of sounds. I love listening to different kinds of genres as well as I like singing different styles of music. Like I said before, I’ve studied both classical and jazz singing, as well as having grown up in a folk music family. You can clearly hear all of those elements in my own music.

Brother Grass was formed in one of those attempts to broaden my musical horizons. I was studying in FÍH at that time, and so was Hildur, Sandra and Soffía, the other members of the band. We decided to arrange one concert together where the music from the movie Oh Brother Where Art Thou was the focus point. 4 years and 2 albums later, we are still going strong. Oh and I must not forget the Brother Grass! My brother, Örn, to be exact. He is the only boy in the band.

But what I’m most excited about these days is my solo project. After that inspiring year at ICMP I’ve started writing even more and have gotten myself a group of amazing people to perform with. Aron Óskarsson (who I also perform with in a London based jazz band called Good as Gold), Helga Ragnarsdóttir and Anil Kamalagharan are 3 fantastic musicians and great friends that I’ve been so lucky to have with me on this adventure.

Me and Anil are also working on a collaboration project we call Tutela. We are making some kind of cinematic, ethereal music that is very much done through improvisation. I’m extremely excited about that project. We plan on releasing an album in the new year.

HVUM: We certainly recommend that our followers check out your music on SoundCloud are there two or three songs that you’d like them to hear? Why do you choose those tracks? Special reasons?

OE: There are three songs that are very close to my heart.

Pillow talk is a song that I wrote when I was going through my first real heartache. I mean, we all have to write that one sentimental song about ones broken heart, right?

Ástarnetið is another song I’m very proud of. The poem is by my favorite Icelandic poet, Páll Ólafsson. Too bad you can’t understand the words, but I assure you, they are beautiful! :) Anil Kamalagharan did the arrangement for that song.

Conversation in a Cathedral is an improvised piece by me and Anil. It was the first time we met for out Tutela collaboration. Both of us improvised a melody over few piano chords, without hearing what the other had done. We then put the two melodies together and the fitted perfectly, like a conversation.

HVUM: You mentioned earlier that you have an interest in drama and film. Do you consider music to be your lead objective followed by other interests or do your interests converge in one way or another?

OE: I think it is very much intertwined. For me, performing music is to tell a story, or paint a picture with sounds. Folk music is all about telling a story and that is why I am drawn to making music that takes the listener on a journey and I it would be a dream come true to write music for films and theatre.

HVUM: With that in mind, we’d like to show our followers your video-documentary Heim.

Heim from Ösp Eldjárn on Vimeo.

HVUM: What are your career plans for the London scene, or better, what are your short-term goals in general?

OE: My short-term plans are to perform my music live and get more into the London scene. I have some exciting gigs coming up in November and I’m also planning on releasing a single, followed by an EP in the spring. Tutela project is also taking an exciting route, so stay tuned for that :)

Ösp, thank you very much for taking time to share your story and your work with us. We know that you’ll b releasing exciting new work in the near future, so let’s stay in contact. We look forward to meeting up again soon!

Visit Ösp Eldjárn on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/OspEldjarn


7 October 2014

WINTER FILM AWARDS challenges the local New York City community to create a 4-7 minute short film in a specified genre, tagline and prop in just a single gonzo weekend! Thirty teams of the most creative people in the tri-state area have just 48 sleepless hours to decide what they are going to do, write a screenplay, assemble props, costumes and actors, rehearse, shoot, score and edit their film. Students, amateurs, and seasoned industry veterans alike learn the importance of caffeine, team work and time management in successful filmmaking.

For the 2012 Challenge, teams had to contend with a large brightly-colored snowflake sugar cookie and a tagline from Fight Club. For the 2013 Challenge, we made it even more difficult — Teams had a tagline from Ghostbusters and Gray Line New York provided each team with one-hour private shooting time on a double-decker sightseeing tour bus, complete with Tour Guide and Driver. What will we come up with this year?

Visit the WFA YouTube playlist to view all of the amazing films from last year.

The 2014 WFA 48-Hour Film Challenge gets under way on Friday November 7 at 8pm. A representative from each team must come to our offices at 419 Lafayette Street, New York NY 10003 at 8pm to sign in to the Challenge. Entries may be shot either via traditional filmmaking equipment or teams can do the whole thing on smartphones. There is no fee to participate in the challenge, but teams must pre-register to ensure a spot.

Completed films are uploaded to YouTube to garner the coveted “Fan Favorite” vote – for the 2013 Challenge, films received 65k views!

On Friday November 21, the best entries will be screened at Blondies (212 W 79th St, New York NY 10024) followed by an Award Ceremony, awesome prizes and networking party. Over $7k in prizes will be awarded for BEST PICTURE and FAN FAVORITE. Awesome prizes generously provided by B&H Photo, Ride of Fame, Jungle Software, Indoor Extreme Sports, The Paint Place, Chelsea Piers, Sleep No More / The McKittrick Hotel, Pole Position Raceway, NY SKYRIDE, City Wine Tours and others!

For challenge rules, prizes, registration details, participating sponsors and more information about the Winter Film Awards, please visit www.WinterFilmAwards.com

WINTER FILM AWARDS mission is to recognize excellence and diversity in cinema and to promote learning and expression for all artists at all stages of their careers. We celebrate the cultural mixture that is New York City, showcasing emerging filmmakers from every age, ethnic, racial, religious, cultural, political and geographic perspective. The 48-Hour Challenge format gives filmmakers a chance to work closely with a team and to intensely focus while just going out and doing it!

Winter Film Awards INC.
info@winterfilmawards.com

September is finishing, and so is summer apparently. We’ve had an amazingly warm month where Parisians haven’t had their notorious cranky attitude, but they’ve actually seemed to enjoy their life, taking their “apéros” near the canals and lying down on the beautiful parks.

ÉCU team has had a busy but exciting month; we received loads of cool indie film submissions and we made new festival partners from all around the world! We feel that joining the forces with other festivals could help the very best talents to screen their fresh and innovative films to as many international audiences and industry representatives as possible.

Indeed this month our beloved partner Naperville Independent Film Festival in the US has shown 14 films from the 2014 edition of ÉCU to the American audiences. We are very happy and proud of this long-lasting collaboration and we cannot wait for October, when other two European festivals will showcase our films: Tyrolean Independent Film Festival in Austria and Aarhus Independent Pixels in Denmark.

Being surrounded by the long and naked legged fashion week models, Paris is surrounded by beauty and charm. If you are a filmmaker there is no more excuse for procrastinating… Send us your films; we would love to see what the indie world has to offer this autumn!

Don’t forget to stay in touch with ÉCU through our channels: Facebook, Twitter, Tumblr and more… We will make sure you will keep being updated with the latest news about independent cinema, about autumn events in Paris and other interesting and amusing stuff.

First published on 25 September 2014

What’s The Buzz ?


Malika Makouf Rasmussen

Malika Makouf Rasmussen

San Francisco Auditorium embraces hybrid musical and visual identities – a new piece by Malika Makouf Rasmussen and Ken Furudate. Its very essence is the incorporation of various cultural traits as a challenge to the myth of singular and absolute representation.

Release in Oslo, Norway – October 11 @ Cafeteatret

Line up:
Malika; strings, percussion, sound design
Ken Furudate; video art, sound design
Safaa Al-Saadi; nai and percussion
Ketil Kielland Lund; keys and flugelhorn
Luis Landa-Schreitt; drums and percussion

Malika Makouf Rasmussen (France/Norway/Algeria) is a critically acclaimed composer, musician and music producer and a philosopher. Incorporating a variety of African and Western instruments blended with electronic sounds forms the sole foundation for her music. She has performed extensively throughout Europe and Africa and has staged numerous festivals and music venues across the world. In 2013 she met the international touring renowned artist, programmer and designer Ken Furudate (Japan) in Tunisia: San Francisco Auditorium is the result of a fruitful artistic encounter that took place between them.

Samples from the piece are included below in Malika2014.

Visit Malika Rasmussen at www.malikamakoufrasmussen.com

A Lecturer in Popular Music at a British Higher Education institution, Denigrata Herself is undertaking her PhD in women in extreme metal. She is also the front woman/guitarist in Denigrata, an experimental black metal collective. Denigrata have coined the term noir concrête for their music, meaning the avant-garde dark noise initiated by Pierre Schaeffer and Karlheinz Stockhausen finds a different rhizomatic existence within their contemporary black metal performance space.

Denigrata Herself is a gender theorist whose research and publications to date focus on body performativity, reclamation of female space, tattooing, graphic novels, death metal and black metal. She is part of the International Society for the Study of Metal Music (ISMMS) and sits on various academic and equal rights boards in the UK.

For over a decade she was a lead guitarist in British death metal bands, she was signed to and worked for various independent record labels and now devotes her time to lecturing, researching and performing. She is choir master for her departmental chamber choir and presents annual post-modern renderings of canonical classical pieces with her choir, a string quartet, a contemporary band and Ableton performers.

4 0ctober 2014

Mastodon and the Meat Market: how the mighty have fallen

Metal has always defined itself in antagonism to the mainstream, and consequently does not speak from inside it. It has sat on the margins, the periphery, and created itself a space to critique the symbolic order. It has used philosophy, bigotry, consumerism, politics and other concerns in its art, its lyrical form and video. As such, metal has always strived to embody a different way of doing things, not always successfully but it is widely acknowledged that it is different from the mainstream. As a result, its acolytes also embody a different ideological perspective and these issues together, manifest a space that is freer to create, to be, to exist.

This has often meant that the rebellious human spirit has found a welcome home in metal, allowing like minds to forge a path that is not prescribed by the hegemony, that is more open and free thinking. This is certainly one of the reasons I love metal. It is the musical form, the ideological position and that space for self-expression that has supported my evolution as a person, as a woman and as a musician.

As with any music genre, as it has grown, certain specifics that were once archetypes become embedded as ‘the way to do things’ in metal. Sometimes these are not particularly helpful, such as the patriarchal, white demography of the music but existing inside this, is arguably a less constructed space than we find in mainstream hegemonic society. As I was growing up, I found this mainstream a too prescriptive place to exist. I was not prepared to be a palimpsest, to have my own narrative rewritten by society because I was expected, through socialisation, to be one kind of woman only. My ontology was more expansive. So, metal became my home, as a fan and eventually as an extreme metal performer.

We become astute in gauging what constitutes metal, musically and aesthetically. Precisely because we position ourselves in antagonism to the mainstream, we have defined ourselves accordingly. When a signifier presents as ‘un-metal’ we are pretty quick in identifying it and analysing it. This can be a riff or a vocal style or it can be how a band looks and their how their artwork somehow fails to embody metal principles. Perhaps I am being too generous but I hope not.

Through my own developing feminist ontology, I have always worked very hard at being an extreme metal guitarist and vocalist. You have to if you’re going to be good, gain respect for your art and carve out a space for your own performance. I am still doing this, ten years later. Whilst there is sexism in metal, that I tackle as much as I am able, it is a sexism that is more readily identifiable than the complexities of the mainstream and therefore, for me, it is a more tangible realm to navigate. However…sometimes metal fucks up, gets misdirected for any number of reasons and sets us back.

It is also important for me to say this: my feminism, my ontology and my way of being a woman is no more or less important than anyone else’s. Women should be free to do anything they want and to engage with their bodies, with society and music however they wish. That is my feminism. So to see women twerking in Mastodon’s video is actually not my problem. My problem is women being objectified for the purpose of selling a song. My problem, to break it down even further, is ethnic women dancing within a white male context for white male pleasure. That to me is unacceptable. It is also unacceptable because metal knows better than to be so lazy, stereotypical and trite.

So it comes as a surprise to no-one except perhaps Mastodon, that their new video for ‘The Motherload’ has poked a bear. That is, a fucking angry feminist bear that would rather take a shit in the woods than have to endure watching that video again. It has also riled the metal community because we have a history of trying to be different from the mainstream, rather than riding on any trending coat tails that happen to be fashionable at any given moment. But before we all get riled up in a swarthy social media hot mess, let us examine the evidence…

The video begins in a typically Mastodon artistic style, where one can easily read the symbology of the white man bent double under the weight of a huge bell, chiming the death knells for our existence. Are we being primed for an existential engagement within a musical context? Well, this is certainly where it seems to be going. There is an obvious Western religious engagement here, with an apple and a man reaching for the forbidden fruit which is nothing new for metal but interesting nonetheless. Metal has never been the shy or retiring genre unwilling to engage with grand theory, religious dogma and philosophy. The band is playing and something is scratching at the corners of my mind although I’m unsure just what it is yet…

Then boom, at 45 seconds in, as the man carrying the bell, who we encouraged through the positioning of the camera, to identify with, walks behind a line of ethnic women twerking. Wait, what?! I rewind the video just to double check what I’m seeing and low I am greeted by lyrca-clad female bodies thrusting. As the video progresses, the song meanders along and the twerking bottoms dominate not only the screen but the space for the song itself. I am unsure what exactly I’m being encouraged to give my attention to. I thought it was supposed to be the music…

There appears to be some kind of competitive twerk-off, the band obviously debated whether or not the psychedelic fractals should disappear crevice-wise and decided against it (because that would have been too much right?!), everyone hugs and then presumably goes home for a nice cup of tea. So what is it exactly that is troubling me? Well, a number of things as it goes. Let us focus on the music first. Now I’m not sure at what point over the last couple of years I began to realise that Mastodon, that mighty, hungry and well-respected band who released some game changing albums and reinvigorated metal by infusing it with energy, seriously good fucking riffs and THOSE DRUMS faded to what I now see before me. I have seen them live, bought their albums, learnt the whole of Remission and Leviathan on the guitar because I was fucking entranced by their song writing and not that it is possible to always write the same music for a entire career but there is one vital thing I have to question with this song – intent. Did they feel that compulsion to write this? Did they wake up at 3 in the morning with that burning inspiration? What is the drive behind this because quite frankly the song sounds like a young, newly formed band who really really want to sound like Mastodon but aren’t good enough at their stagecraft yet. I’m not criticising the playing, I am however criticising the composition. Why is intent so important I hear you ask? Well I’ll tell you. You cannot force the creative process. You cannot paint, for example, if you do not want to and whilst the pressures of being in a band with labels requesting you stick to a release schedule, you cannot compromise your art, particularly if you have such an impressive back catalogue like Mastodon. There are a great many bands who have managed to strike a balance between song writing and label concerns. However, what I see with ‘The Motherload’ is a band grown bloated on their success, so much so that the hunger seems to have been sated. The riff, whilst it has echoes of their previous contrapuntal style, seems like it is missing the passion and whilst there is nothing wrong with common time 4/4 drumming, it seems like the lazy option for such an accomplished performer. If you can write like Bach for example, why would you choose to write like One Direction…

Consequently the song comes across as bland, it is boring and even the band look bored playing it. So one begins to wonder, is this why there are twerkers? To detract from the banality of the song? To refocus the audience to not pay that much attention to a half-arsed bit of writing?

And so to consider the function of power differentials in the video. To tackle the twerking first seems to make the most sense. Let me be perfectly clear – I have no problem with twerking. It is not for me to have a problem with twerking because women can do what they like. I don’t know a lot about the cultural intricacies of twerking but I do know about metal and there is a race dichotomy to apply here – twerking is black and metal is white. Now what is the most incongruous part of this video is precisely its inclusion in a predominantly white male popular music video. It is not an intrinsic part of metal culture and women do not, generally speaking perform like this in metal videos. Instead, we are usually relegated to poles, strippers and other simply fabulously objectifying practices so race and diaspora aside, women are no better off in terms of our representation. However, why Mastodon have agreed to cultural misappropriation in this video is what we should be questioning. The video looks like two separate genres squashed together and whilst there is nothing inherently bad about this, in fact I rather relish the collision, this is a really bad example of how to do it. Like when Fear Factory tried to ‘do techno’. Nope. It’s shit. Stop it.

It is important to acknowledge some glaringly obvious and tired gender binaries that this video enshrines and perpetuates. We have a typically white male band, invested with their own agency, performing at the apex of masculinity, with autonomy and independence. Nothing new there right? Male – subject. We then have ethnic female dancers (yes, classically trained according to http://sexpoleandmma.tumblr.com/post/98998006844/mastodonopinion and how wonderful that is! Better that than a bunch of women just falling over their own, er, arses). The women in this video are performing for men – for the band and for the fans. And the assumption is that the fans are all male. Oh right, but I am a fan, what about me? How is this video hailing me? How is it interpellating me? The simple fact is that it isn’t. It isn’t acknowledging me as a female fan at all, unless I am to look at the wobbling bottoms, at Mastodon’s suggestion, as a paragon of female agency? I think not. So, annoyingly, we have female – object. How very boring. How reductive, irritating and boring.

Now also according to this blog, all the women were treated really nicely, were respected and made to feel welcome. Well, good, I’m glad about this but what were they expecting exactly? What preconceptions of metal did they harbour for them to be pleasantly surprised by their good treatment?! News flash – this is how human beings are supposed to be treated. Don’t be surprised by it, expect it! Why shouldn’t you be treated well?! Were you expecting to be treated like meat? Like objects? I wonder…Another issue that comes up in the blog is the acknowledgement of the women’s good education, as if this fact is meant to counter the use of their reified bodies in the video. Oh you’re all really well educated and doing PhDs?! How phenomenally useful that is because that really comes across in the video. That arse in my face and I’m thinking, oh I bet her Cultural Theory will be applicable here so she can deconstruct just how many fucking layers of subjugation this functions on…Barthes would be proud. If the twerking in this video were meant as some kind of rebuttal (boom!) at white women doing it (ahem, Miley!) then I really think Rihanna nailed it in her video for ‘Pour It Up’. That surely was the end of that particular ownership argument.

But I hear the clatter of keyboard warriors caps lock shouting ‘but they were paid to do it!’ and yes indeed, they were and they did a fine job. It is not with the twerkers that I find the problem. It is with Mastodon and the patriarchal structure of metal. Dearest boys, you have been lazy in assuming this video would pass as something nearing even ok metal standards, particularly given your previous excellence. Resorting to cultural misappropriation, sexism, racism and the promotion of tired power differentials to carry a shadow of your former glory is not going to wash. Dom Lawson’s piece in The Guardian this week identified some of this rather well.

And no, ethnic women twerking for white men is just not ok because white men are the rule makers and controllers. They are the hegemony. They are the ones in power. For those who do not fit this remit, we are the marginalised, the other, the culturally disenfranchised. So simply by having the big three, race, gender and class in one video, Mastodon have managed to fuck up everything they may have wished their video to convey. That is of course, unless what they wanted to say was ‘white male musicians are the best, black women are there to be objectified and exocitised and their arses are more important than their right to agency and we’re better than everyone else because we’re men with guitars’ then yeah. Great. Well done. I’m impressed.

Mastodon, you could have done something great here but instead you have opted for this. Girls, I’m jolly glad you all had a smashing time and were treated like human beings coz ya know, we all belong, but just spare a moment for the women in metal who work fucking hard based on our musical abilities, not the cultural and sexual currency of our naked arses. Given the patriarchal structure of not only metal, but the music industry in general, it is important that women occupy space for themselves, not to be used in the means of production to sell white male music to other white males.

Comments are welcome. Denigrata Herself can be contacted at denigrataherself@horizonvumusic.com


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

On 10 and 11 October this year, Music City, Nashville, Tennessee in the USA, will celebrate a big event, the 89th anniversary of the Grand Ole Opry Show. For this event, many artists will be present …including Trace Adkins, Carrie Underwood, Craig Morgan, country pop trio Rascal Flatts, Josh Turner, and Brad Paisley. The short list is very long !!

Trace Adkins

Trace Adkins

Carrie Underwood

Carrie Underwood

Craig Morgan

Craig Morgan

Josh Turner

Josh Turner

Brad Paisley © 2013 American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

Brad Paisley © 2013 American Broadcasting Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

It all started in this beautiful red building, a former church made of wood, which is now the emblem of true traditional Country Music. In 1925, George D. Hay broadcast over a radio station, WSM. Soon he was joined by violinist Jimmy Thompson and together they launched a show called “WSM Barn Dance”. With the tag “We dance in the barn” the program was broadcast live. The show aired on the “WSM” radio.

On October 2, 1954, the young Elvis Presley made his first and only appearance. WSM which still exists today, was the first country radio station to broadcast its programs over AM. with its powerful 50,000-watt transmitter, emissions could be heard almost anywhere in the USA and beyond; north to Canada and south to Mexico. The Grand Ole Opry Show has become an institution and many large names in music have been inducted into the Grand Ole Opry.

George Jones

George Jones

Patsy Cline

Patsy Cline

George Hamilton IV

George Hamilton IV

The Everly Brothers

The Everly Brothers

The legendary George Jones, The Everly Brothers, Patsy Cline, George Hamilton IV, more recently Trace Adkins, Martina McBride. … Paradox marking Hank Williams, who is none other than the Father of Country Music, was expelled from the Grand Ole Opry in 1952, a year before his death because of his alcohol problems.

Hank Williams

Hank Williams

A victim of its huge success, in 1974, the Grand Opry show left the legendary Ryman Auditorium and moved to a larger and more modern the Grand Ole Opry House located outside the city center. But in the aftermath of major floods that severely hit Nashville in May 2010, the Grand Ole Opry House was completely submerged by water. It is thanks to this natural disaster, the Ryman Auditorium came back to life again as the Grand Ole Opry. Now renovated, the legendary venue and exceptional show is waiting for you! So if you go to Nashville soon, make reservations at the Grand Ole Opry! Note the dates of October 10 and 11 for the 89th anniversary!


Tiger Bell

Tiger Bell

We’ve been lucky enough to get to know more about Swedish punk rock band Tiger Bell. The band has its origins in northern Sweden, but it was in Stockholm, in 2010, that they began to play together. If your checking them out (Lisa, Canan, Lovisa and Lotta) you’ll find their names in bands such as Rewind, Satirnine and Fare You Well. Tiger Bell is some pop, some punk and a lot rock. All in all, it adds up to an incredibly high energy foursome that knows how to make music you can feel.

HVUM: Thanks very much for talking with us. We know a little bit about Tiger Bell from online bios, but we’d like to know more about Lisa, Canan, Lovisa and Lotta. Can you let us in on the personal sides of the band members? Where are you from? What are your music backgrounds?

TB: Three of us are from a town in the north of Sweden called Luleå where we grew up as childhood friends. We met Canan when we moved to Stockholm a few years ago. All of us listen to different kinds of music, but all of us like rock.

HVUM: What brought the four of you together as a band? How did Tiger Bell happen?

TB: When Lisa, Lotta and Lovisa moved to Stockholm they needed a bassplayer. Canan saw that on their Myspace (yes, Myspace, can you imagine) and sent an email. We decided to meet and after that Tiger Bell happened!

HVUM: How about the name? What inspired Tiger Bell?

TB: We had like a band meeting where we were supposed to come up with a band name. We thought Tiger Bell sounded cool.

HVUM: Musically, who are your major influences?

TB: We get inspired by music with high energy. Could be any kind of music actually, but it needs to have passion and power!

HVUM: When you’re touring and not performing, what do you like to do together for fun?

TB: There is often so little time to do stuff when you are on tour. If there is time, we try to visit nice places. Could be a restaurant or a tourist spot. Sometimes we just stay at the hotel chilling also.

HVUM: On your site, the band is described as having “one foot in pop, one in punk and one in rock”. Tell us about how you hear that mix in your work.

TB: We play Punk rock music. But more Rock punk music. But we’re really into poppy melodies. And that is why we ended up with all those feet.

HVUM: We heard you at Rock-En-Seine and really got into your performance. You generate a lot of energy with what we described between us as a slightly rough rock –punk edge (compliment).

TB: Thanks!

HVUM: So, let’s talk punk for just a minute. It’s interesting how – call it a subculture if you want – punk has lived on far beyond the 70’s and Richard Hell and The Voidoids, MC5, The Clash, Iggy & The Stooges, Patti Smith, The Sex Pistols and The Ramones…but as Dorian Lynskey (Guardian) has pointed out it’s not nostalgia that keeps punk alive. There’s more to it. Your thoughts?

TB: I believe that it is the energy in the music that is keeping this genre alive. You can’t listen to punk music without getting your emotions triggered. It could be any emotions: anger, happiness whatever. And if you don’t get triggered I think you’re listening to a lousy punk band.

HVUM: Do you think that punk (or post punk) holds to a primal anti-establishment, anti-authoritarian ethos (or maybe it’s just about getting by with what you’ve got)?

TB: I think that depends on the people behind the different bands. The bands and their music is just an extension of the people playing it.

HVUM: Let’s have a look and listen to Tiger Bell and “Slaughter’s Daughter”

HVUM: Looking back over your hard work and the summer tour, what do you think of as your “high” point…your “low” point? Based on your experience, what works really well for the band and what doesn’t work so well?

TB: I think the hi’s and low’s can very very much. Not so much depending on how big the venue is or how crowded it is. It’s a mix of our mood, if the crowd is enthusiastic, if we have gotten good food before the show, slept well.. [ Ha ha], I don’t know what more but lots of things affect us.

HVUM: What’s next for Tiger Bell? Tell us the next two or three things on you “to do list”!

TB: We have like a short break when it comes to touring. We’ll be starting to rehearse new songs soon and then probably record something. We wanna tour soon again, so hopefully it won’t take too long!

HVUM: Okay, now we have to ask Phil’s favorite interview question…Name your favorite superhero. In your case you are actually allowed up to four, but we want to know which of you names which superhero!

TB: Hm, that was a hard question to answer. Depends on the criteria for a superhero I guess. One of mine could be Jem from the movie Jem and the Holograms!

HorizonVU Music thanks you for taking time out to join us. We know you and the band are going to continue to enjoy success going forward. Stay in touch!

Be sure to visit Tiger Bell at http://www.tigerbell.com/ and https://www.facebook.com/tigerbellband


Women of Substance Radio has been on the air for 4 years. We broadcast 24/7 on the Live365 Network and iTunes Radio garnering fans from all over the world. WOSRadio plays the BEST female artists, both label and Indie, in all genres. We hand-pick all of our music starting with icons of the past like Carole King, Joni Mitchell, Carly Simon, Fleetwood Mac, Heart, Tracy Chapman, Mariah Carey, No Doubt, Tori Amos, Sarah McLachlan, Jewel, Michelle Branch, Kelly Clarkson, Sara Bareilles, Colbie Caillat, Adele, Carrie Underwood, Amy Winehouse, Feist, Christina Perri and so many more. Women of Substance take submissions from Indies and our review board selects only the best quality artists and songs that can stand up next to the forementioned superstars. Indie artists we have chosen early in their career have gone on to be Top 24 on American Idol, win second place on the Bravo show Platinum Hit, and one artist is currently a chosen contestant on NBC’s The Voice.



Women Of Substance Radio Top 20 Tracks

1. Tivoli Skye – I’m Yours

Tivoli is a 2013 Indie Music Channel Award winner and she has been honored for her courage in “standing up for what is right” and forming her own awareness/advocacy event with local government officials, organizations, and musicians called “Stand up & stand out! – Positive Role Models against bullying, abuse and for suicide prevention/Awareness”.

2. Natasha Meadow – Without You

3. Tivoli Skye – Our Hearts Are One

4. Isabel Rose – Never Satisfied

5. Jenna Laurise – Coming Home

6. Katie Garibaldi – Lock The Door, Lose The Key

7. Nikki Nash – Room For Me

8. Hollywood & Mars (writer Nitanee Paris) – Angels Like You

9. Sandy Rapp – Remember Rose

10. Jennifer Jones – Tell Me

11. Katie Garibaldi – Follow Your Heart

12. Voodoo Highway – Been A Long Time Baby

13. FUE – Sweet Release

14. Deborah Wargnier – Have You Ever Wondered?

15. Elayne Terranova – Careful What You Wish For

16. Hollywood & Mars (writer Nitanee Paris) – Some People

17. Kathleen Chenoweth – Just Lie To Me

18. FUE – Go On

19. Rebecca Tatum – Angel Band

20. Brandie Hill w Yung Citizen – Hope


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

Team News Nashville visited Switzerland last weekend during the 26th edition of the Country Night Gstaad!

The festival was packed with an audience ccoming from all over Europe, attracted by a beautiful poster, the choice of the organizer Marcel Bach, who has put together a program “High Color” in the terms of the American artistic artistic plateau.

THe night featured one of the masters of bluegrass music, Ricky Skaggs, singer Kellie Pickler and the talented Josh Turner. Accompanied by top musicians Mister Ricky Skaggs offered us, as usual, an excellent performance, drawing here and there on the register of classic Traditional Bluegrass withthe inevitable “Uncle Pen” or taking from the Country 80s with some major hits like “Heartbroke” and “Highway 40 Blues.” Ricky Skaggs has announced that he will release a new album entitled “Hearts Like Ours” to be released September 30. Kellie Pickler brought a a very mice surprise!

Kellie sang his hits interpreted as New Country, but she also performed the true traditional country music with good times from the repertoire of her idols like Tammy Wynette. She perfectly imitated the voice of the title Tammy on “Stand By Your Man.”

Kellie ignited the audience with a great version of the famous very rock’n'roll tinged title of the legendary George Jones “White Lightning,” . She also performed covers of Loretta Lynn, Pam Tillis (”Someone somewere Tonight”) and finally, a cover of the legendary Patsy Cline and “Crazy” sung “a cappella,” which was not an easy task ! A very moving show with anecdotes that Kellie Pickler told us throughout the concert. Above all the audience was pleasantly surprised by the talent of excellent musicians and the undeniable vocal power of Kellie Pickler, very impressive!

Then finally came the highly anticipated artist Josh Turner, the top of the poster for the 2014 Country Night. Josh Turner also gave a superb, extremely well-rehearsed performance,including “American” and numerous music videos. The performance was impeccable, so perfect it was like listening to a CD.

We were fortunate to discover a preview of the new single which arrives this week on American radio waves but also on iTunes, entitled “Lay Low,” a title that will appear on a new album, but we still do not know the name and release date. Josh Turner has not lost his way, but for a while he became commercial reminding us repeatedly of the address of his website www.joshtuner.com,


mentioning the name of its sponsor “Ariat” which is just another brand of boots and not to forget the release of his first book “Man Stuff” In short, the pure direct sales Live! As you can see, the 27th edition of the Country Night Gstaad was a real success!


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