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Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Sally has helped her clients heal vocal damage, expand vocal range, land a Broadway show, record their own music and tour internationally without vocal fatigue or strain.

Singers, your body is your instrument. It’s a brilliant, perfect musical instrument when you allow it to work naturally. To work well, you instrument must be straight and strong, open and flexible.

Sally Morgan_Shoulder Relaxation

The equivalent of poor posture is taking the neck of a guitar and bending it, expecting it to still be playable and sound great. Life is busy, tense, filled w/activities that make our shoulders tight – throwing your body alignment out of whack.

Watch this video lesson, an actual lesson from SingLikeYouSpeak.com, my online voice lesson website. Enjoy! Enjoy!

Contact Sally Morgan


What’s The Buzz ?


Katie Garibaldi Follows Her Heart To A New York Tour And Debut Show At Rockwood Music Hall!

If “heart follower” could be used to describe a career title, Katie Garibaldi would be called just that. Refusing to be labeled as a singer/songwriter in a one-trick box, Garibaldi’s musical genre teeter-totters between country and pop-esque elements, all the while keeping her modern folk roots with true to the gut lyrics, strong melodies, delicate and soul-filled birdsong vocals, and her driving steel string guitar’s finger-picking and syncopated rhythmic styles.

She picked up a guitar at age 11, unaware of how much it would awaken her deep-rooted purpose, wrote her first song that very day, and has been devoted to a life of music ever since. A DIY independent artist from the get-go, Katie Garibaldi has built her career from the ground up. Now, two decades later, with her seventh full-length album, Follow Your Heart, newly released, an endorsement deal with Breedlove Stringed Instruments, who worked with her to build her a custom Master Class guitar, several songwriting awards on her mantel, and recent rave reviews from Guitar Player magazine, who called her “a gifted songwriter with a gorgeous voice,” this Americana songstress has proven to be an artist with staying power.

Based in the golden city of San Francisco, this determined and enthusiastic singer/songwriter/guitarist is an avid national touring performer who has acquired a devoted fan base, due in large part to her engaging live shows, and personal katiegaribaldi_photo_gal__photo_392328942_lrconnection to her listeners through her music. She sings with an emotional nearness that, in combination with her melodic and catchy songs and her soulful and expressive vocals, captures her audience wherever she performs. Her new album, Follow Your Heart, which was recorded at John Vanderslice’s Tiny Telephone Recording Studios in San Francisco, CA, and engineered by Ian Pellicci, features some of the writer’s most personal songs, includes performances by notable musicians, including multi-instrumentalist Max Butler and the Magik*Magik Orchestra, and spreads her message loud and clear of the importance of listening to the voice inside one’s heart.

A regular name along the California and West Coast, as well as frequent visits to musically ablaze cities like Austin, TX and Nashville, TN, Katie Garibaldi is following her heart’s compass this summer to the East Coast for her first ever New York tour, including a debut performance at the highly esteemed venue Rockwood Music Hall on June 29, 2015.

Katie Garibaldi Current New York Tour Dates:
Wednesday, June 24 – Silvana
Thursday, June 25 – Map Room at The Bowery Electric
Saturday, June 27 – Muchmore’s
Sunday, June 28 – The Parkside Lounge
Monday, June 29 – Rockwood Music Hall, Stage 1
Tuesday, June 30 – American Trash

All shows are free to the public.

“Not all those who wander are lost,” according to poet J.R.R. Tolkien, which can certainly be said about musical troubadour Katie Garibaldi. In an industry full of critics and naysayers, Garibaldi has stayed true to herself as an artist and songwriter throughout her fruitful career, and has demonstrated that as long as she follows her heart, she will always be exactly where she needs to be.

See Katie Garibaldi live on her first New York tour this June 2015, featuring a special debut performance at Rockwood Music Hall on Monday, June 29th at 6:00 PM on Stage 1.
Rockwood Music Hall is located at 196 Allen Street in New York, NY. This show is free and 21+.

For more information and tour dates, visit www.katiegaribaldi.com.

Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

This year and for the 28th consecutive year, the Country Rendez Vous Festival team was mobilized still offering us a great show. You can mark your calendars; the dates of this mega festival are 24 25 July 2015, that is to say, the last weekend of July! Here are all the details of what awaits you: the French group Les Rivets Sauvages.

Les Rivets Sauvages

Les Rivets Sauvages

RockinBonnie & The Mighty Ropers

Rockin'Bonnie & The Mighty Ropers

Some have already performed in 2014 with their very traditional musical style! The Canadian Mister Soul will offer you 100% Johnny Cash with the Wanted Man Show, a Tribute to Johnny Cash. I think it’s worth moving for all lovers of the Man In Black! The quintet Rockin ‘Bonnie & The Mighty Ropers will be part of the party! They will come specially from Italy to give a rock’n'roll touch to Country Rendez Vous! Watch for honky tonk with Del Rio Ramblers coming straight from the United States.

Del Rio Ramblers

Del Rio Ramblers

Many Americans traveling to and from the festival include: Linda Gail Lewis who is none other than the sister of the illustrious and legendary Jerry Lee Lewis.

Linda Gail Lewis

Linda Gail Lewis

Sarah Gail Meech

Sarah Gail Meech

Live Wire

Live Wire

She is also a gifted piano starting from the age of 14. I invite you to come in droves to applaud! LiveWire is a group not to be missed. They will show you their country style slightly tinged with rock! You want the real country? Do not miss the concert of the talented Sarah Gayle Meech! Coming from the Texan Lone Star State to set fire to the stage wil be Micky & The Motorcars!!

  Micky & The Motorcars

Micky & The Motorcars

Sophie Tapie

Sophie Tapie

Of course I will not forget the special guest: Sophie Tapie along with many other artists. For more information, please visit the website of the festival! http://festivaldecraponne.com . The Craponne team has kept us entertained for a long time and now announces the coming of a great artist from Nashville, Craig Morgan! The country man is a true redneck; a former policeman turned singer.

Craig Morgan

Craig Morgan

He will offer us for sure a great performance, thanks to his vocal potential, dynamism and kindness! Johnny Da Piedade will again be present on the stage of Craponne to present this very beautiful artistic plateau. Congratulations to the entire team for this great work!! Now that you know almost everything, just to note the dates of 24, 25 and 26 July 2015!


25 May 2015
The World Needs Female Rock Critics
by Anwen Crawford

Reposted from http://www.newyorker.com/culture/cultural-comment/the-world-needs-female-rock-critics

Crawford-The-World-Needs-Female-Rock-Critics-690

Don’t tell anyone, but I don’t own any albums by the Rolling Stones. They’re just so archetypal, so very rock and roll—and that, I find, can be a difficult thing to admire. Rock music has rarely offered women the same tangible promise of social rebellion and sexual freedom that it has given men—though plenty of women, myself included, have tried all the same to find those liberties in it. “Boy guitarists notwithstanding,” the journalist Lillian Roxon wrote to a friend, in 1966, “I don’t think I can stand the sight of another bloody electric guitar.” I know just how she felt.

In 1969, Roxon—Italian-born, Australian-raised, an experienced journalist and a star of Warhol’s back room at Max’s Kansas City—would publish “Lillian Roxon’s Rock Encyclopedia,” the first of its kind, a marvel of research and critical acumen. Within six months of publication, the book had entered its third hardcover print run, and Roxon was profiled in the Times. The book has now been out of print for decades. (Roxon died in 1973, at the age of forty-one.) Ellen Willis, a contemporary of Roxon’s, was The New Yorker’s first popular-music critic, beginning in 1968, but a collection of her music writing, “Out of the Vinyl Deeps,” was not published until 2011, five years after her death. This month, the American writer Jessica Hopper, a senior editor at the music Web site Pitchfork, publishes a book called “The First Collection of Criticism by a Living Female Rock Critic.” The title is more provocation than statement of fact, but it is not entirely untrue. Books by living female rock critics (or jazz, hip-hop, and dance-music critics, for that matter) are scant. In an introductory note to her book, Hopper names Roxon, Willis, the English journalist Caroline Coon, and the anthology “Rock She Wrote,” edited by Evelyn McDonnell and Ann Powers, as precedents for her own work. “The title is not meant to erase our history but rather to help mark the path,” Hopper writes.

That path is not an easy one to discern. The most famous rock-music critics—Robert Christgau, Greil Marcus, Lester Bangs, Nick Kent—are all male. Bangs, who died in 1982, at the age of thirty-three, remains the most iconic of them all. Why? Because his hard-living, drug-taking, sunglasses-after-dark-wearing gonzo schtick made him as much of a masculine anti-hero as his rock-star subjects were. The pose doesn’t work as well for female critics, from whom displays of bad attitude are seldom tolerated, let alone celebrated. Rock’s rebel women, including its writers, are rarely assumed to be geniuses; often, they are assumed to be whores. In a 2002 biography of Lillian Roxon, “Mother of Rock,” by Robert Milliken, Roxon’s young protégé, Kathy Miller, recalls being challenged by a male editor who assigned her to write about The Who and then asked for a blow job in return, saying, “What’s the big deal? You’re a groupie.” She replied, “I’m a woman who writes about rock and roll.” His answer: “Same difference.” Groupies have proved an enduring stereotype of women’s participation in rock: worshipful, gorgeous, and despised.

Earlier this year, Hopper interviewed Björk for Pitchfork. In the interview, which is not included in the book, Björk reflected at length upon the ways in which women’s labor and expertise—inside and outside of the music industry—go unnoticed. “It’s invisible, what women do,” she said. “It’s not rewarded as much.” She observed that her male collaborators are typically credited for the sound of her records; because on stage she mainly sings, there is a widespread assumption that she neither produces nor plays an instrument. “I want to support young girls who are in their twenties now and tell them: You’re not just imagining things,” she said.

When I was about fourteen, I stood outside science class holding a folder that was decorated with an array of faces which I had carefully cut out from the pages of music magazines. Pointing to a photo of Björk on my folder, a passing boy sneered at me, “I bet you don’t even know who she is.” (This would have been around 1995, when the music press was having one of its periodic crushes on Women in Rock.) I did know who Björk was, because my mother, who was young and groovy, had raised me on the Sugarcubes, the Icelandic band that Björk was a member of before she launched her solo career. I don’t remember raising this point with my accuser, but if I had I doubt he would have believed me. The record store, the guitar shop, and now social media: when it comes to popular music, these places become stages for the display of male prowess. Female expertise, when it appears, is repeatedly dismissed as fraudulent. Every woman who has ever ventured an opinion on popular music could give you some variation (or a hundred) on my school corridor run-in, and becoming a recognized “expert” (a musician, a critic) will not save you from accusations of fakery.

The problem for women is that our role in popular music was codified long ago. And it was codified, in part, by the early music press. In the effort to prove the burgeoning rock scene of the sixties a worthy subject of critical inquiry, rock needed to be established as both serious and authentic. One result of these arguments—the Rolling Stones vs. Muddy Waters, Motown vs. Stax, Bob Dylan vs. the world—was that women came out on the losing side, as frivolous and phony. Whether a teen-age fan or a member of a girl group, women lacked genuine grit—even female critics thought so. “The Supremes epitomize the machine-like precision of the Motown sound,” wrote Lillian Roxon in her rock encyclopedia. “Everything is worked out for them and they don’t buck the system.” Judgments like that are still routinely applied to female artists today. In Hopper’s book, under the chapter heading “Real/Fake,” appears a 2012 essay on Lana Del Ray, an artist whose look harks back to those big-haired, mascaraed sixties singers, and whose career has unfolded beneath a cloud of suspicion as to her credentials, musical and otherwise. “As an audience, we make a big stink about wanting the truth, but we’re only really interested in the old myths,” Hopper writes. The myth of women’s deceitfulness is one of the oldest.

For early female music critics like Roxon and Willis, the flashpoint was Janis Joplin. Joplin, like the Rolling Stones, borrowed heavily from the blues; her ragged style seemed to mark her as the real thing. But her lonely position as, in Willis’s words, “the only sixties culture hero to make visible and public women’s experience of the quest for individual liberation,” also left her open to attack. Joplin’s sexual daring, and the contempt she faced for it, revealed the limits and the hypocrisies of the counterculture. “Writers rape her with words as if there weren’t any other way to deal with her,” Roxon wrote. The frustration that many of Joplin’s female fans felt at her treatment, and their sadness at her premature death, was something these women carried over, shortly afterwards, into the first stirrings of women’s liberation. Both Roxon and Willis became involved in the feminist movement; Germaine Greer’s “The Female Eunuch,” published in 1970, was dedicated to Roxon, whom Greer described in the dedication as “Lillian the abundant, the golden, the eloquent, the well and badly loved; Lillian the beautiful who thinks she is ugly.”

Academia, a step or two removed from the machismo of the newspaper room, has proved a more accommodating realm for women writing about popular music. In that sphere, essays and books by writers such as Tricia Rose, Daphne Brooks, Aisha Durham, Alice Echols, Gayle Wald, and Angela McRobbie contribute to a rich and ongoing feminist analysis. Writing by these women appears only intermittently in the mainstream press, but forty years of critical feminist theory on popular music has slowly filtered into the outlook of younger critics; as Hopper noted in a recent interview with the Hairpin, online publishing has given rise to “this ferocious crop of really opinionated young writers writing about race, gender, queerness, the body—people coming in with a pretty immaculately formed critical framework.” Hopper, who started publishing her criticism as a teen-ager in the midst of the early-nineties punk-feminist upsurge known as riot grrrl, mentioned in the same interview that when she began writing she did not have “anything more than a high school education.” Her autodidact tendencies and her energetic, conversational writing style form part of another long music-press tradition, the looser and more playful side of that sixties push for seriousness—though Hopper’s stylistic immediacy does not preclude her from covering difficult subjects, like the endemic sexism of punk rock, or the “banal and pernicious” contrivance of Miley Cyrus.

The often neglected path blazed by female music critics intersects with other related writing traditions. Memoir has long been used by female performers to reflect upon the pressures and contradictions of their roles. Kim Gordon’s “Girl in a Band,” Tracey Thorn’s “Bedsit Disco Queen,” and Viv Albertine’s “Clothes, Clothes, Clothes. Music, Music, Music. Boys, Boys, Boys.” have lately joined earlier classics like Mary Wilson’s “Dreamgirl: My Life As A Supreme” and Tina Turner’s “I, Tina” to provide female perspectives on popular music. There is also a small but noteworthy strand of contemporary fiction by women that takes popular music as a primary subject, from Jennifer Egan’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “A Visit from the Goon Squad” (2010), with its sleazy music-biz manager, to Eleanor Henderson’s impassioned treatment of eighties New York hardcore, “Ten Thousand Saints” (2011), and Dana Spiotta’s mysterious “Stone Arabia” (2012), in which the brother of the narrator chronicles his strictly imaginary success as a rock star.

Perhaps fiction and memoir, more than criticism, provide space for female writers to dissect all that is maddening and wonderful about popular music: the spectacle, the chicanery, the beautiful lies it tells us. But there is plenty of need for female music critics yet. “Take it easy, babe,” Mick Jagger sang in “Under My Thumb,” still as glistering a slice of unrepentant misogyny as ever it was, unredeemed by time or by the million screaming girls who wriggled beneath Jagger’s commands. In a 1971 essay, Ellen Willis argued that Jagger’s “crude exhibitions of virility” were less sexist than the “condescending” pose of a bohemian like Cat Stevens; insofar as rock, she wrote, “pitted teenage girls’ inchoate energies against all their conscious and unconscious frustrations, it spoke implicitly for female liberation.” I don’t entirely agree with Willis’s defense of the Stones, but I do recognize the difficult trade-off she describes, between the freedom that rock can feel like, for a woman, and the subjugation that it might celebrate. It’s between these boundaries that the female critic works, hoping to clear a path.


Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Sally has helped her clients heal vocal damage, expand vocal range, land a Broadway show, record their own music and tour internationally without vocal fatigue or strain.

Sing Like You Speak technique uses the natural ease and power of the speaking voice to ‘teach’ a singer how to sing just as easily and naturally. This is because most of us have some very strange habits around our singing. So ask yourself, “What if I talked like I sing?”

As you will see in this video, talking like you sing can have some pretty funky results! Enjoy.

Contact Sally Morgan


Amia Franz

Amia Franz

Amia Franz is an American Born, singer, songwriter, guitar player and she writes in the Alternative Neo-Soul, R&B, Smooth Jazz, Funk and Soft Rock Blues genres. Amia has some brand new songs she has written, will record in NYC and will release in 2015, serve up some romanitc love songs with interesting subjects that will touch your heart. Songs like, “I’m Just Across Town Boy”, dedicated to the loss of her only brother John Weston, who died tragically at the age of 17 but with a lyric story that has a fun uplifting message!

The plan for Amia is, to record a total of 10 songs with some note worthy people involved in her project. Paul Cooke, legendary producer and founder of the band Sade (he wrote some of the bands biggest hits and Sade is still going strong outselling the female artist Adele in the US), will be the executive producing all of Amia’s new songs. The co -producer /engineer is Scott Lea, owner/A&R at RadicLea Records out of NYC , Platinum Record Award RIAA, and working with many commercial artists including Sly Stone (Sly and The Family Stone). Scott played guitar with Sly on a remake of Family Affair and on a track for rapper Stevie D. “To the Maximum” , Sly played keys and co-wrote the track. Also signed up to work on the recording project are some very note worthy musicians. Amia Franz is an experienced performer and has recorded in some of the top studios both in the states and abroad.

Amia Franz is an experienced performer and has recorded in some of the top studios both in the states and abroad. Amia is critically acclaimed for her singing, songwriting and she has added playing her own guitar solos to her resume. She will be singing on all of her new songs and she will play and record solo guitar parts she has written into some of her songs. One of the highlights of her past performing experience, was being asked to sing backup, for a headlining band performing at the popular Minneapolis Minnesota club First Avenue (still owned by the artist Prince). In recent years, on May 25th 2013, when the listeners and radio staff votes were tabulated for the Starliners Radio Network Indie Best Artist Music Award she came in as runner up for the song “First Avenue” (written in 2007 and released in 2011 ). That same year, she released a song called “Deep Love” that was nominated for Best track of the year in the fall of 2013. Currently, the Starliners Radio Network has once again nominated her for Best Artist and voting starts in the fall of 2015.

With a tight economy, Amia has created a funding campaign she calls Amia Music 4 Compassion 2015. She hopes to bring in what is Amia Franz_001possible from her fans to help with the recording expenses. The reward for her and Paul Cooke will be the highest quality masters that they plan to market and this takes some bucks! That said, Amia says, “When you help me fund my recording project, you are helping me fulfill my dream to complete songs I have poured my heart into, and wish to perform live. Your donation will help Paul Cooke and myself bring amazing talent and relevance to my project. My hat comes off, for those that make the decision to help me advance in the music industry!” Amia Franz

You can pick up some freebie past releases of hers by going here http://www.amiamusic.com/
You can find out more by going to her funding profile here http://www.gofundme.com/amiamusicfunding

What people are saying after hearing just samples of Amia’s new songs that she has created a nice demo medley including her vocal coach-

“Amia possess a very unique sound, style, and approach to music that the world will definitely want to hear. This is just the beginning of her journey and your help will get her voice heard.” – Roger Burnely, Vocal Coach

“With Song Heaven in You Eyes” and “Your Love Touched Me” Amia Franz is solidly in her zone. Her performance on these tracks is both upbeat and soothing. She skillfully delivers high-energy elegance managing to stay far away from the abyss of contemporary easy listening music” – Phil Cartwright

“You are awesomely talented as a singer, songwriter and artist. Your artwork on the Divine Artistic Designs site is some of the coolest stuff I’ve seen. Very inventive. You’ve got a new fan here.” – David Jerkins

“Good Luck as you follow your dreams painting the sky with song!!! Wishing you every joy and many opportunities to share your art!!!!!” Christie Brinkley Model/Actress/Artist

Visit Amia at her Personal Website

http://www.amiamusic.com


Chetti: Our Responsibility As Artists

Chetti is a pop-soul singer and songwriter based in NY. Born and raised in Brooklyn, Chetti’s music reflects her upbringing, her values as a person and an artist, and of course, her hometown. She recently released her debut EP “In The City.”

Chetti: Our Responsibility As Artists

Things have changed so much for women in the music industry over the years. A business that was once dominated by a male force has now become a business in which there is a balance of power. Some of the highest paid entertainers are women and many have broken the mold even further by becoming female rappers.

As a female pop artist, I feel we have to keep in mind that we are making music for the masses, and that being said, we are molding the minds of so many. Not very many female artists are considering that young people are listening to their music and mimicking their every move. For that, I feel that female artists should really take into account how their own actions may translate to a person that might not have enough experience or knowledge to make the right decisions for him or herself.

I think Taylor Swift is doing a beautiful job of this. She’s been super creative and artistic and she talks about adult subject matter in a classy way. She’s an artist for all ears, and that’s huge for women. It’s easy to fall into the groove of being overtly sexual, mainly because it corrals easy attention. Disclaimer: I am not mother Mary. I don’t think there’s anything wrong with being sexy, but I do think everything is best in moderation.

I feel that it’s our responsibility to promote being the best versions of ourselves we can be – to encourage women to continuously better themselves, to learn, to experience, to dream, to adventure, to love and to always remember that we can be as many things as we please. We are limitless. That is what I feel will bring about longevity and respect and inspire people who listen to our music.

I want to be the type of woman and artist that mothers encourage their daughters to look up to and their sons to marry, and from there set an example for the women that will come after me. I believe the presence of women in music should represent an indistinguishable force, one of complete substance. We have an immense power and we need to apply as much positivity and light as we can – we hold the future in our hands.

Visit Chetti at

www.chettiofficial.com
www.soundcloud.com/chetti_official
www.facebook.com/chettimusic
www.twitter.com/Chetti_Official


Hello! My name is Alison. I’ve been passionate about country music since I was very young. I got to know music by following styles – rock, southern rock and the country music styles of today – and by cruising through the USA. I’ve also bought a lot of CDs! In recent years, I started broadcasting the “Les News de Nashville” on the Big Cactus Country presented by my friend Johnny Da Piedade. You can read my blog post on the Big Cactus Country site as well as here on the HorizonVU Music Blog and SHOP!

Big Cactus Country Radio Show!!! The best of American Country presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert! The BCC is a syndicated radio Show presented by Johnny Da Piedade and Alison Hebert broadcast weekly more than 250 times. The BCC network is 120 affiliated radio stations in France, Reunion Island, St-Pierre-et-Miquelon, Belgium, Switzerland, Quebec and more.

This week in Nashville News, we will look to artists who will set fire to the stage from Tours Canadian Music Night Saturday, July 4 as part of the American Festival Tours! As usual, it was Franck Boucheraud who concocted the programming of this prestigious event especially dedicated to Canadian artists!

This year you go to appreciate the talent of the family duet “One More Girl” and that of the artist A aron Pritchett! Were first begins with the female duo “One More Girl.” It is composed of sisters Carly e t Britt McKillip. They come straight from the city of Mapple Ridge, located in the province of British Colombia. Carly and Britt have always been cradled in the arts, as their parents were both songwriters. Their father, Tom McKillip is a leader, a renowned guitarist and reputation that has received multiple awards. Very young, they found themselves before the cameras to appear on several Canadian and American television series. Then in 2008, they came to the front of the stage, with numerous concert dates before shutting themselves in the studio in 2009 to make it their first album entitled “Big Sky” with the key 4 singles that will invade the airwaves of Canadian radio and it works. In 2010 they got a nomination for the Duo of the Year Award GRAB a “Rising Star Award” awarded by the Canadian Country Music Association that is the prize for best new talent or rising star. After recording numerous singles and video clips, their second opus arrived – “The Hard Way” published in February 2014. They pursue the trodden with the release of a new song called “Drunk Heart” already hit in Canada. This new single is taken from a new album to be released soon!

Aaron Pritchett, the star of the Canadian Music Night!

Ronald Aaron Pritchett, better known by the name of Aaron Pritchett is also a native of the province of British Columbia and specifically Vancouver. On Saturday, July 4, 2015 there will be exclusive to the scene of the Canadian Music Night. For the record, Aaron is a songwriter’s interpreter who began his first career as a DJ at Rooster’s Country Cabaret Bar in Vancouver. That was in 1996, and at that time he used to go on stage to sing again with the saloon group. It is with this same group that he will record his first album “Young In Love”. His look and his musical style is original and explosive; a mix of both rock and country and elsewhere one could even compare it to American Bad Boy, Jason Aldean. He currently has six albums to his credit and a seventh is in preparation! The last single released this year entitled “Wake You With A Kiss”.


FEBRUARY 24-27 2016 | NYC

ABOUT WFA

Winter Film Awards (WFA) is a volunteer-run and operated celebration of the diversity of local and international film-making. Our Mission is to recognize excellence in cinema and to promote learning and artistic expression for people at all stages of their artistic careers with a focus on nurturing emerging filmmakers and helping them gain recognition and contacts to break into this difficult industry. We pride ourselves on our diverse collection of Festival selections, allowing our audience to enjoy films they normally wouldn’t think to seek out.

Now in its fifth year, the rapidly growing Festival showcases the work of emerging filmmakers from around the world. For the 2015 Festival, 76 films from 29 countries were selected for screening, including 34 by female directors and 20 student films, and 75% had a budget under $50k. Works of all genres, forms, and lengths are considered for Festival screening.

Outstanding work will be awarded for each category, along with Best Director, Best Actor/Actress, Best Original Score, Best Foreign Language Film, Best Student Film and the NY PERSPECTIVES Award for best depiction of the New York multi-cultural experience.

Like many of the great film Festivals across the country and the world, WFA seeks to bring our audience compelling and unique content that inspires the viewers and honors the filmmakers. There are hundreds of film festivals in New York City; what makes us different is our intense focus on the variety of our films and helping new filmmakers reach what may be their first real audience.

WFA is a minority- and women-owned registered 501(c)3 non-profit organization. We work with all local NYC film schools, colleges, arts high schools and many cultural societies.

Awards & Prizes

Prizes will be awarded for:
Best Picture (Feature Film, 60+ minutes)
Best Short Film (2-60 minutes)
Best Horror Film (any length)
Best Student Film (any length)
Best Music Video
Best Original Score (Film must have 10+min original music integral to film)
Best Foreign Language Film
Best Animated Film (any length)
Best Documentary (any length)
Best Web Series
Best Director
Best Actress
Best Actor
Perspectives Award for best depiction of the NYC experience

WHAT WE ARE LOOKING FOR

We seek fresh voices and creative indie films from NYC and the entire world in all genres – feature length and shorts, narrative fiction, documentary, animation, horror and music videos.

Now in its fifth year, the rapidly growing Festival showcases the work of emerging filmmakers from around the world. For the 2015 Festival, 76 films from 29 countries were selected for screening, including 34 by female directors and 20 student films; 75% had a budget under $50k. Works of all genres, forms, and lengths are considered for Festival screening.

ABOUT WINTER FILM AWARDS

Winter Film Awards is a volunteer-run and operated celebration of the diversity of local and international film-making. Our Mission is to recognize excellence in cinema and to promote learning and artistic expression for people at all stages of their artistic careers; we focus on nurturing emerging filmmakers and helping them gain recognition and contacts to break into this difficult industry. We pride ourselves on our diverse collection of Festival selections, allowing our audience to enjoy films they normally wouldn’t think to seek out.

Submit your film via FilmFreeway

Submissions@WinterFilmAwards.com
www.WinterFilmAwards.com
WINTER FILM AWARDS …Where extraordinary filmmakers are recognized
WINTER FILM AWARDS is 501(c)3 registered non-profit organization.
Donations to Winter Film Awards are tax deductible to the extent provided by law.


Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Sally has helped her clients heal vocal damage, expand vocal range, land a Broadway show, record their own music and tour internationally without vocal fatigue or strain.

“If I train my voice, will I sound trained?” I am asked this question often by singer-songwriters.

Most singers’ idea of a trained voice is sounding like an opera singer – an affected, covered sound. I can understand singers not wanting that sound – I certainly don’t!

Sing Like You Speak training grew out of my frustration with classical training. A great singer needs training, but training that frees your natural sound – training that helps you respond to the music with a healthy and powerful voice.

This video singing tip illustrates the difference between classical and contemporary training. Enjoy!

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