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Britta Phillips

Britta Phillips
Luck or Magic
Double Feature

Britta Phillips’ solo album is a luscious, seductive mix of pop arrangements including both original material and covers.

Visit Britta Phillips at Facebook and iTunes


Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Sally has helped her clients heal vocal damage, expand vocal range, land a Broadway show, record their own music and tour internationally without vocal fatigue or strain.

Do you practice a vocal warm up routine? Are you aware of what your warm up is warming up? Seriously. Every timeyou sing, you are creating muscles memory for an exercise, a song, a specific pitch on a specific word. A good warm up Sally Morgan_warm upwarms up the muscles that naturally help you make a free and powerful sound.

Yes, you do have voice muscles. They are the muscles that help make singing easy and free. Are you building the right muscles with your warm up? If not, then you are only reinforcing bad habits and using the wrong muscles to sing.

What is a good vocal warm up routine? An excellent vocal warm up leads to vocal mastery.

A good vocal warm up leads to Vocal Mastery by

-Focusing on 1 skill or task at a time because research proves single tasking is the quickest way to mastering a skill

-Building habits of good vocal production – skills that do not involve conscious thought

-Connects vocal production to the natural way your body produces sound

-Following a step-by-step process so that one step prepares for the success of the next step

-Building your confidence in your singing ability with consistent technique

Everyone has the perfect musical instrument. It’s You – it’s your body. A good warm up helps to restore the effortless singing that is natural to all human instruments.

To begin your warm up, first accept that your body is your instrument. When your instrument is straight, strong and open, your voice will be also. You would not bend the neck of a guitar and expect it to play well or in tune. The same is true for your vocal instrument.

There are many, many techniques to help with good posture. The most effective for your singing uses core muscles to hold the body erect leaving lower back and abdominal muscles free to do their job of helping with vocal production.

Warming up and building core muscle for good posture is Step #1 of an excellent vocal warm up.

Begin by standing with both feet flat on the floor. Widen at the hips, open the heart, broaden the collarbones and pull your head back on top of your body – earlobes over shoulders.

Now your voice has the chance to flow freely through your human instrument.

Learn more at http://singlikeyouspeak.com/warm-up/


ECU_2016
The European Independent Film Festival, Europe’s premier event for independent cinema, announces its 25 award winners for 2016.

After screening, 77 films from 31 countries over the past 3 days it all comes down to one moment: the Award Ceremony. Films competed across 14 categories and were judged according to their quality, creativity, and independent spirit in both form and content. Judged by a panel of internationally acclaimed industry experts, jurors found it difficult to choose this year’s highest honour Best European Independent Film 2016. ÉCU is proud to present our 2016 Award Winners:

Best European Independent Film 2016 THE CHICKEN (Croatia/Germany) Una Gunjak
Best European Independent Dramatic Short HORSEFACE (Spain) Marc Martinez Jordán
Best European Independent Dramatic Feature VANITAS (Belgium) Oscar Spierenburg
Best European Independent Documentary WOMEN IN SINK (UK/Israel) Iris Zaki
Best European Independent Experimental Film REFUGEES (Netherlands) Eduardo Hernandez Perez & Hans Jaap Melissen
Best Independent Music Video CIRCLES (Estonia) Helen Takkin
Best Independent Animation THE OLD MAN AND THE BIRD (Germany) Dennis Stein-Schomburg
Best Independent Comedy DISCIPLINE (Switzerland) Christophe M. Saber
Best Non-European Independent Dramatic Short THUNDER ROAD (USA) Jim Cummings
Best Non-European Independent Dramatic Feature KIDNAP CAPITAL (Canada) Felipe Rodriguez
Best Non-European Independent Documentary LIFE ON THE BORDER (Iraq/Syria) Basmeh Soleiman, Delovan Kekha, Diar Omar,
Hazem Khodeideh, Mahmod Ahmad, Ronahi Ezaddin, Sami Hossein, & Zohour Saeid
Best Student Film THE VAN BOMMEL BROTHERS (BELGIUM) Laurens Jans
Best Short Script 6TH OF SEPTEMBER (Romania) Ionut Gaga
Best Feature Script AS AN ACTRESS (Austria) Maria Hinterkörner
Best Actor PATRICK’S DAY (Ireland) Moe Dunford
Best Actress LOVE/ME/DO (UK) Rebecca Calder
Best Editing THE WAY OF TEA (France) Coban Beutelstetter
Best Cinematography THE SEED (Belgium) Kassim Olivier Ahmed
Best Director THE MAN OF MY LIFE (France) Mélanie Delloye
Special Jury Mention SEMILIBERI (Italy) Matteo Gentiloni
BALCONY (UK) Toby Fell-Holden
WELCOME (Spain) Javier Fesser
Audience Award WHILE YOU WERE AWAY (UK) Ben Mallaby
The Ahmed Khedr Award for Excellence
in Arab Filmmaking LITTLE GANDHI (Turkey/USA/Syria) Sam Kadi
Excellence in Women’s Filmmaking UNTIL 20 (USA) Jamila Paksima & Geraldine Moriba


Programm

Programm
A Torrid Marriage of Logic and Emotion
The Hand

Toronto-based quartet Programm (Jackie Game, Jacob Soma, Mark Game, Andrew Reesor) has released the follow-up to their EP “Like the Sun” with their debut full-length album “A Torrid Marriage of Logic and Emotion”. The release brings together a potpourri of styles including post-punk and electronica.
Visit Jackie Game and Programm at Facebook and iTunes


cate le bon

Cate Le Bon
Crab Day
Drag City

Eccentric, contre-mainstream, experimental…this fourth full-length single is worth a long listen!
Visit Cate Le Bon and Crab Day Facebook and iTunes


“You just need to believe in yourself. Anyone can sing. Anyone can play the guitar. It’s not that people can say that “I’m not good at that”. It’s not true. You have to not let fear hold you back.” Heather Boo, Beau

On 1 April, HorizonVU Music’s Phil Cartwright met up in Paris with Beau – Heather Boo and Emma Rose – for an informal conversation about the duo’s background, development and points-of-view toward music and expression. Many thanks to Viviane Bres, Kitsuné Records, for making the meet-up possible.

HVMU: This afternoon we have the opportunity to visit with Emma Rose and Heather Boo – together known as Beau. It’s a real pleasure for HorizonVU Music to have the chance to hear your live performance and meet you for a visit today. We can talk a bit about your background, what’s been going on with Beau and talk a bit about the future.

We’ve done our homework reading your profile and interviews that you have done (The Village Voice and Numéro, for example). We understand that you are from New York City, you met through family connections and you have been friends for a long time. You are basically self-taught as far as your musical background is concerned which is quite incredible. Developing on your own is quite amazing.
Can you tell us a bit of the backstory? We have a following of young female emerging musicians and they like to hear from success stories. Surely, you didn’t decide just to have a band one day and all of a sudden you had a manager, a label and went on tour. Can you tell us how your story evolved?

Beau2HB: Well, we were always writing music. We started writing songs. This was after we knew how to play the guitar. This is before I started singing. I thought I was going to be a guitar player. We were writing songs, we got inspired by other musicians who are songwriters and we just knew that is what we wanted to do. We started writing and playing guitar together and that’s when things came full-circle. We realized that we have a lot to say. Not only that, but were not going to be self-conscious and be held back. We were going to write, write, write and produce until we thought we had something we felt good about. We made a lot of music. We recorded music on our iPhone and someone heard it.

I started singing and Emma started playing the guitar heavily. She got really involved. She started when she was twelve years old. She just grew. I started singing and became more confident. There’s a thing about music. You do not need to take lessons. You just need to believe in yourself. Anyone can sing. Anyone can play the guitar. It’s not that people can say that “I’m not good at that”. It’s not true. You have to not let fear hold you back. We are human beings in a society where we have been chanting and singing melodies for years, so that is natural.

So, a friend of a friend heard our music and introduced us to the head of our record label. He popped the question whether or not we had a record label and whether we would like one. We said “yes”.

HVUM: That’s fabulous; a great story. When you look back from where you re today and thinking about people that are starting out, were there any real bumps in the road that you hit and you haven’t forgotten them? How did you get over the bumps?

ER: There are bumps in every road. I don’t think it was one big thing that happened. It was a bunch of little things that happened
Beau3 all the time. That’s where the magic happens, too.

I think the attacks in Paris were really crazy for us. We were on tour in Europe at the time. We were in The Hague at the time. We had the day off the day after the attacks. We started asking ourselves what we should do. That’s one time we questioned whether or not we should take a break. It was scary and it first seemed like musicians were targeted, but of course, it was everyone. That was a big eye-opening event for us in the world. Other than that no real problems.

HVUM: That’s great. So far, so, good. One thing that we’ve noted about your music is that you have a very cool eclectic sound. As we listen to the album we hear rock, folk/rock, a little blues, folk, and some punk and even some jazz. The punk came through more in your live performance last night than it does on the album. The album is beautiful. There is some more “mellow” sounding music. Many musicians have a hard time being eclectic. They hit on a genre and stay with it. They never get outside the borders. How did you pull it off?

ER: We never thought about it. That’s how we pulled it off. When you start thinking about things, nitpicking and judging your music that’s when it all goes wrong.

HB: We are inspired by a lot of people growing up in New York. Every day we wanted to write. I feel like performance-wise making a genre for a band can be a big mistake. Either the band makes the genre or the people make the genre. If the band makes the genre they stick to one thing. If the people make the genre they need to put a label on each song.

BeauOur style and the style of our producer shows through on our Beau album. This gives the album a more specific genre than the live performance, but each song is so different that it should be put under its own genre like “open” or “worldly” or “confusing”. What makes a really good performance is the range a person can give to the audience. You’re expressing yourself. You are expressing the truth of the song, the emotion of the song. You have to be honest with the song and if you are honest each song will be different.

ER: On our set list we also try to put different kinds of songs.

HVUM: You mix it up very well. Can you help us tie together the title, ”That Thing Reality” with the tracks.

HB: Since all of the songs are so different, “That Thing Reality “ is a really good title. For me it felt right. Emma came up with the title and I felt very comfortable with it.

HVUM: What’s the story behind “Animal Kingdom”?

HB: It’s a funny story. Originally we didn’t know what to do with it. It sounded great; great melody, great hook. We weren’t sure if we wanted to talk about the relationship between man and beast or politics…

We had a crazy drummer and we produced a different version of it. It was crazy pop-punk. We all struggled with it. Writing with three people s difficult. We decided to put it on the album. Emma came with final lyrics that were solidified. Emma put it together. It was almost like a book; so detailed. We still didn’t feel comfortable. In the studio it was the last song we worked.

ER: It’s fun to play live.

HVUM: We’ve posted the video and it gets a positive response. Keep it up! Other than music, what do you do for fun?

Beau Photo Credit: Amber Byrne Mahoney Photography

Photo Credit: Amber Byrne Mahoney Photography



ER: Walk a lot.

HB: We like to walk and write and draw. In New York anything can happen; a naked guy walking down the street and somebody gives him a pair of socks and a shirt.

ER: I like Chinatown.

HB: We never get tired of New York. It’s always changing. No store stays there for more than five years. It still feels like home.

ER: And we have ridiculously creative and talented friends from New York. Sometimes I’ll call one of them. If they’re in a move I’m with them just because they’re so “out there”.

HVUM: Thanks for your time and we hope you’ll keep us up to date. Hopefully you’ll come back to Paris and have a night to yourself so you can play all twelve tracks. It’s been a pleasure talking with you and we wish you all the best!

Visit Beau on Facebook and Twitter


Bleached

Bleached
Welcome the Worms
Dead Oceans Records

Great, powerful L.A. pop-punk. Much prefer Welcome the Worms to Jennifer and Jessie Clavin’s 2013 release Ride Your Heart. Favorite tracks “Keep On Keepin’ On” and “Sour Candy”.

Visit Bleached at Facebook and iTunes


Margo Price Photo Credit: Angelina Castillo for Third Man Records

Margo Price Photo Credit: Angelina Castillo for Third Man Records

Margo Price
Midwest Farmer’s Daughter
Third Man Records

Debut album from the Nashville based singer-songwriter. It’s retro-country with a lot of soul.

Visit Margo Price at Facebook and iTunes


Gun Outfit
Gun Outfit
Two Way Player
Wharf Cat Records

Olympia to LA rockers Gun Outfit have released their EP. Featured here are three sample tracks: “Expansion Pact”; “Make Me Promise”; and “King of Hearts”. As to Carrie Keith’s vocal on this latter Lucinda Williams cover – totally on target.

Visit Gun Outfit at Facebook
iTunes


Sophie_banjoSophie Tapie is known for her work in music, film and television. On 9 April, she takes center stage at The European Independent Film Festival presenting her experience-based views on barriers and keys to success for women in film and music.

The purpose of this workshop is to further understanding of the barriers and keys to success through the personal experiences and observations of featured speaker, Sophie Tapie. In addition, the program is intended to facilitate the networking among people interested in issues related to participation of women in film and music and to suggest action points.

Sophie Tapie was born in Paris in 1988. At 17, she went to London in order to attend classes in music, dance, and comedy at “The Arts Educational School.” Following two years of study, she graduated and returned to France with the certainty that music will govern her life. She has met with and worked with different authors / composers / French interpreters, she seeks her style, her voice …

Passionate and hard working, in parallel to her music, she has performed in theater (Oscar) and made a film (24 days Alexandre Arcady), a TV series (Commissioner Valencia), and she hosts a TV show (Equidia TV).

In 2012, she participated in The Voice. Noticed by the Canadian label Vega Music, Sophie moved to Montreal for a few months to work with Steve Marino and a successful director from Montreal, Steve Marino. In 2015 she released her album, “Sauvage”: 12 tracks that make us look and travel in a world full of humor and lucidity, ideals and freedom.

Follow Sophie on Facebook and Twitter


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