Tag Archive: HorizonVU Music


“Obliterated: Getting Back Film Herstory”

By Casandra Prerost

Horizonvmusic.com took great pleasure in sponsoring the workshop “Obliterated: Getting Back Film Herstory” by Elizabeth Orrin and Casandra Prerost at the ECU Film Festival ’19 here in Paris back in April this year. Clearly the Cannes Film Festival 2019 was inspired by the same image of the great Agnès Varda as we were!

We wanted to build on a presentation we sponsored back in 2014, “Where are the Women?” also presented by Casandra , to see where there had been advances and where things needed to improve and with a nod to Agnès Varda, to see how we can keep Film Herstory.

The research process for Elizabeth and Casandra was one of endless discovery and the Wow factor. Both presenters are well schooled and knowledgable in the film industry (Masters degrees in Film and Film and Video Production) but were astonished at the enormity of women’s contribution to the film industry and highlighted the great pioneers like Alice Guy-Blaché and Lois Weber. The other discovery was the process of forgetting or obliterating these pioneers. Case in point:

Certainly the situation has improved and there is a greater exposure and research of women’s involvement and contribution to the development of the film industry. But the authors looked more closely.

For a long time editors were called cutters and guess what, they were women. When the job became editing (an Irving Thalberg initiative, inspired by his work with Margaret Booth), it transformed into a male profession. But most of the innovations in editing were made by women. And Margaret Booth and Anne Coates were major contributors, the only editors to receive a Academy Award for lifetime achievement.

But when we look more broadly it is truly amazing, the technical complexity, the innovation and the great collaborations with directors where , unfortunately with time the female editor is forgotten or even “edited out” of credits (as was Yolanda Benvenuto) and simply disappear from the film canon taught to ensuing generations of film makers.

The authors highlighted the “forgetting” of the pioneering work of so many editors like Yelizaveta Slilova (the collaborator of Dziga Vertov) , Esfir Tobak (the collaborator of Sergei Eisenstein) and Yolanda Benvenuti (the editor for Roberto Rosselini for 30 years, written out of the film credits and replaced with a man).

The presenters used a test from www.womenfilmeditors.princeton.edu on our audience ( of independent film makers and film students primarily). How did they do? Badly, like the authors.

The first time any editor was ever credited “upfront” was in 1967: Dede Allen for Bonnie and Clyde. The list is long – check out the presentation PDF here – for your enjoyment and edification on the current situation, herstories, great links, great research , a mind-boggling list of great films edited by women.

Check out the 2018 video “Edited by” about women editors – you will be amazed.

EDITED BY (the film companion to WomenFilmEditors.princeton.edu) from Su Friedrich on Vimeo.

So what happens now? We provided an action list to our participants -good to go.

And lastly, Elizabeth and Casandra have a complete workshop structure for any film school/ cultural studies courses. Contact details on the Obliterated PDF

Casandra Prerost

Music2Deal CEO Mario Christiani Interviews Midem Director Alexandre Deniot

Originally posted at https://music2deal.com/fr/site/news#24680 on 21 May 2019

Alexandre Deniot

Mario Christiani: Hi Alexandre. So what exactly do you do at MIDEM?

Alexandre Deniot: I am the director of Midem. So, I’m in charge of this event globally. I manage all the teams from the conference team to all the partnership teams and I make sure that we provide the best service to our music community.

Mario Christiani: Please tell us more about the upcoming MIDEM 2019

Alexandre Deniot: This year’s Midem will see multiple initiatives putting artists and creation centre stage as the beating heart of the 2019 edition. These will include the opening of the Artist Hub, a brand new area dedicated to artists and talent development, the fresh addition of Midem Studio Sessions by Dynaudio, a fully-equipped studio where international artists will record live in public. Regarding our conference program, our lineup is just amazing with the heavy players of the industry like the music mogul Troy Carter, (CEO and Founder, Atom factory), Sylvia Rhone (CEO & President of Epic Records) or the Nigerian Artist Maleek Beery just to mention few of them!

Mario Christiani: Is there anything else you’d like to mention that will also be a special focus at MIDEM this year?

Alexandre Deniot: Also the competition for upcoming artists, the Midem Artist Accelerator, we celebrate this year the 5th anniversary, the second edition of the Midem Songwriting Camp and over 30 live concerts on the Midem Beach. Midem will also welcome this year the Jamaican project Inna de Yard, celebrating the work of reggae legends, Ken Boothe, Cedric Myton, Winston McAnuff, Kiddus. We will host the premiere of their music documentary. Midem delegates will also be treated to a live show by the Inna De Yard artists, when they light up the Midem Beach, opening their European concert tour.

Mario Christiani: Hopefully the weather will be fine since there are so many artists playing at the MIDEM beach. Last time the weather was even better in Hamburg, which is not often [laughs].

Alexandre Deniot: We´ll see. We can only pray! [laughing]

Mario Christiani: Why is it an absolute must for every music professional to attend the festival?

Alexandre Deniot: MIDEM is the leading international music event for professionals. It´s a good way for music professionals to save time and money because we have more than 80 countries, about 2,000 companies, 5,000 attendees from the global ecosystem (artist’s entrepreneurs to tech companies). It is the largest international music platform in the world – and it’s growing. And this year we’re going to add 14 new countries at Midem. We provide opportunities for business opportunities and also artistic opportunities for the professionals.

Introducing Charlotte Cardin, Canadian Author, Composer and Singer


By Clara Zicaro, HorizonVU Music

Her Childhood
Charlotte Cardin started to play the piano at the age of 5 but she stopped 2 years after, to focus on singing. She begins to sing at 8 years old. At 15 years old, she takes the plunge and becomes a model for the “financial freedom that this job gets”.

Charlotte Cardin: A Discovery
She is known thanks to The TV show “La Voix» in 2013, a Quebecker declination of «The Voice», in which she finishes in the first season’s head motion trio. Since then, she accepted a duet with the famous singer Garou.

A Double Culture
Native of Montreal, she had a double culture that characterizes this place. “I have always been exposed to a bilingual world.” She is the bearer of an Anglo-Saxon and a Francophone inheritance. “My grand-mother, originating in Alberta was talking English such as some of my friends. At home, French was appropriate.”


Her Inspiration
She is fascinated by Céline Dion and her music lovers’ parents. They were listening a lot to the Rolling Stones and Led Zep.

Her Voice
Charlotte Cardin has a singular voice full of soul that is most of the time compared to Amy Winehouse and Adele. She has taste for pop, jazz and rock’n’roll especially thanks to her father. “I am doing pop music inspired of soul, jazz and trip-hop. I am saying that I am doing pop music because I grew up in this musical world and that I am very proud to define myself as “pop” because this term encompasses today a lot more of things, even if I know that I don’t sound as “American pop”, the one we think about when we cite the term “pop”.

Her Songs
Revealed to the public last year with Main Girl, Charlotte Cardin just released two new singles this month. The first one is: Fous n’importe où in which she sings with CRi, an electronic version of the song of Daniel Bélanger. It is in fact a promotional campaign for the Quebec tourism. The second one is called Drive. Charlotte Cardin also sings covers such as Go Flex from Post Malone, Sorry from Justin Bieber or the mythical Wicked Games from Chris Isaak. Other of her songs refer to Amy Winehouse. Dirty Dirty has some real accents of this singer and Blackened Eyes is a song that certainly evocates her. Charlotte Cardin does not only focus on pop and electronic music but also to jazz with Big Boy, to rap with Like It Doesn’t Hurt (accompanied by the rapper Husser) and to French titles such as Faufile.

Charlotte Cardin covers her tracks with songs from various genres: jazz, electronic, hip-hop and soul music.

Here is the official video for her famous title, “Big Boy”.

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Your Body-Your Instrument-is Smarter Than Your Mind
by Sally

Your body is smarter than your mind. Your body is your singing instrument. So why does singing seem to be so difficult? Sing Like You Speak™ is here to teach you it ain’t necessarily so.

Breathing is completely natural. You are reading this, so your breathing is working – you are alive.

And yet when it comes to singing, we second-guess or even doubt the body’s natural ability. We actually override nature by overthinking the process and relying on the mind to ‘figure it out’ instead of trusting the natural process of breathing and phonation. We actually invite the mind to participate in a perfectly natural process.

Does this sound familiar?

You take an inhale and you immediately think, that isn’t enough air to get through the phrase! So you push and pull at the muscles of your abdomen to “help” your singing process.

But guess what? You run out of breath even faster!

That’s what happens when you take a subconscious process – breathing – and make it a conscious process.

The purpose of your inhale is to open the whole instrument. It is to open your resonators, release the jaw and larynx and open all the way down to the lower back and abdominal muscles, thus activating those powerful muscles that will naturally work to propel breath and sound easily through your open instrument.

When I was developing Sing Like You Speak™ my contemporary vocal technique, I could not ignore the fact that singing is natural. And if singing is natural and breathing is natural – what makes singing so difficult?

Makes singing difficult…

Voice teachers who tell you to manipulate and force the physical instrument
Trying to imitate most singers recorded after 1997 where the singer has been recorded (first was Roy Vedas Fragments of Life) and then a sound engineer has manipulated the voice for better pitch, tone quality, rhythm. You are not listening to a voice but to an electronically altered sound that cannot be imitated by the human instrument.
Myths or false thoughts about the effort involved in singing
Trusting the mind and not the body

Sing Like You Speak™ always uses the natural physiological process for simple, healthy signing. Your inhale is to open the instrument. Done right, releases the jaw, tongue and larynx, opens resonators and activates the very intelligent low abdominal and back muscles. That sound like a lot to do but it can be achieve with one thought.

When I have new voice students who has studied voice with another teacher in the past there’s always a conversation that goes something like this.

Student: That’s it? That’s all you do to inhale?

Sally: Absolutely! A simple opening inhale.

Student: But how do I get enough air to sing a long phrase or to sustain a pitch?

Sally: With a simple opening inhale. It seems you want to feel how much effort you are using to breathe.

Student: Of course. The effort tells me that I’ve gotten a good inhale.

Sally: Aren’t you taking lessons to learn how your singing can be effortless?

Student: Well, I didn’t really believe that it could be easy. My last teacher taught me to push out on the inhale and pull in like crazy to exhale.

Sally: Yes, that’s typical old-school teaching. Let’s experiment with a simple, opening inhale.

First step is a simple, opening inhale…

Align your instrument collarbones wide, head on top of the body
Release the jaw and tongue
Feel as though you are opening your instrument all the way to your bottom
Blow the breath out and simply observe how the abdominal and lower back muscles are working – just observe to not interfere.
Use the above breathing process for our experiment proving how brilliant the body can be. No pushing or pulling of belly muscle allowed!

Experiment 1

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying an FFFFFF
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 2

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying a VVVVV (be a motorcycle)
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 3

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying a ZZZZZ (be a bumble bee)
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 4

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale sighing an MMMMM
Observe what muscles are working
What did you observe?

If you were able to perform the simply opening inhale then with each experiment you felt a different set of muscles working. The physical intelligence of your instrument chose which muscles to use. Your physical intelligence simply knows what to do. Your mind cannot possibly figure out how to use different muscles for different consonant sounds.

I love the fact that my physical intelligence takes over the singing process when I allow it to. Taking the process out of my mind and putting it into the body where it belongs lets me focus on the music, on phrasing, on character, on enjoying the massive vibration of my sound and having a blast doing so!

Click here for the best voice lessons on the web!


HorizonVU Music at Midem 2018
by
Clara Zicaro

Let’s summarize what happen in the home of the global music community. From the 5th to the 8th of June, Cannes welcomes the biggest annual meeting of the music industry. This year, there were over 80 countries, and more than 4000 participants at the international b2b music market. Since more than 50 years, the Midem is created to “share passion for music, build and develop business artist relationships, discover the trends and sounds of tomorrow and…let’s not forget…have some fun”, said the director Alexandre Deniot. On the syllabus, labels, online listening sites and artists meetings during the day, continued by concerts in the evening at the Majestic Hotel beach. The new initiative this years, is to focus on Africa, indeed there were a whole African Midem. Then, by 2022, the Midem want to insure parity in its programming and its conferences.

Live again the « meeting place for the global industry » through its youtube channel https://www.youtube.com/user/midem

Snail Mail
Lush
Matador

Visit Snail Mail at Facebook and iTunes

Lindsey Jordan has released her second recording as Snail Mail. Following on 2016s EP, “Lush” features astonishing guitar work and confident vocals that really work and are undoubtedly going to place her on the charts now and going forward.


Review by Clara Zicaro

Modern Studies
Welcome Strangers
Fire Records

Visit Modern Studies at Facebook and iTunes

Modern Studies band suits well its name, uniting pastoral chamber pop and folk, their approach is experimental. Pooled of creativity, this group of multi-instrumentalists first appeared in 2016. This Scottish chamber pop quartet is composed by the Glaswegian singer/songwriter and doublebassist Emily Scott, the singer/guitarist Rob St. John, the cellist Pete Harvey and the drummer Joe Smillie. Their gentle blend of sounds and harmonies could be inspired by some Britain visionaries such as Fairport Convention, Kate Bush, Pentangle, Nick Drake, Richard & Linda Thompson, Alasdair Roberts. Modern Studies just released last 18th, ten tracks in their second record “Welcome Strangers” led by the nagging and hypnotic voice of Emily Scott. The first song called Get Back Down, begins as a tuning instrument time before concert, then a complex jazzy rhythm is installed where string and brass flourishes. Airy vocals made by Emily are then joined by Rob St John. Progressively, the orchestra opener is transformed into a real concert. The lead single “Mud and Flame” demonstrates a rich vocal presence. Inventive techniques have been established with analogue synths, tube organs, drum machines and mellotrons, this exposes how Emily creates the stuttering rhythm at the beginning of the song.

This second album is a big leap for Modern Studies, showing a promising future in the music industry. See you to their next concert, on Wednesday, May 25 in Edinburg!


Carla Bozulich
Quieter
Constellation

Visit Carla Bozulich at Facebook and iTunes

Recognizing that time moves on and artists evolve (a least the very goods ones), “Quieter” is Carla Bozulich’s fifth album, and perhaps, it is her best. The list of collaborators include Marc Ribot, Shahzad Ismaily, Ches Smith, Freddy Ruppert, Andrea Belfi, JHNO and our friend Sarah Lipstate. Not that her earlier work should be overlooked, but “Quieter” seems more mature. If you are into music-color pairing, you might think about Bozulich’s earier work as red with the kind of tense, scary vibe you get by using diminished 7th chords.

The tension is still there, but maybe the album takes on a sort-of-purple-blue color. It’s hard to say. In any case, with this new release Bozulich demonstrates her continued willingness to experiment, which makes the album particularly important. The opening track “Let It Roll”, a collaboration with John Eichenseer (JHNO) and Andrea Belfi, is eerily seductive in it’s lyrics and instrumentation/effects. “Written in Smoke” is a collaboration with Sarah Lipstate gives exceptional expression to a hazy or murky atmosphere. The final track, “End of the World,”is a jazz-blues piece co-written by Marc Ribot leaves us with the uncomfortable proposition that the end will come in its own time and fostering the kind of pain that parallels the sound of shutters on rusted hinges whipping in the wind. The album is intelligent and deserves acclaim.


Tess Roby
Beacon
Italians Do It Better

“Beacon” is Tess Roby’s debut release. Roby is a classically trained musician who has deployed her skills moreso in her compositions and in the arrangements. There’s nothing particularly complex going on here. In fact, the songs themselves are quite straightforward, but that is not a criticism as the album is entirely in line with her musically set reminisciences.

Visit Tess Roby at Facebook and iTunes


Laura Veirs
The Lookout
Raven Marching Band Records

This is Laura Veirs’ tenth album and her exquisite, smooth vocals are blended with excellent musicianship from guests like Sufjan Stevens and Jim James. Her husband, Tucker Martine, can claim high recognition for the production. The tracks on this album lend themselves to feeling a sense of naturalness or freedom and given solidly based musical foundations it’s an album deserving of attention.

Visit Laura Veirs at Facebook and iTunes


Powered by WordPress. Theme: Motion by 85ideas.
google-site-verification: google0eca8f6b62d9ec8d.html