Originally Posted by California Music Industry Summit
February 25, 2013

https://californiamusicindustrysummit.wordpress.com/2013/02/25/advances-and-success-in-online-music-collaboration/

Sagarika Deb

Sagarika Deb

Collaboration between music artists on the Internet was seen as something progressive for a good part of the new millennium. However, as we continue the next decade of the 2000s, online music collaboration between artists has become something almost standard in today’s music environment. There has been a plentiful amount of music sites tailored for this specific reason, including Jamglue, Lightspeed and Splicemusic. Sadly, due to varying reasons, many of these websites shut down years ago.

But there are some music collaborations websites and forms of software have survived and even thrived, including Indaba Music (the most popular and used for composition, recording a remixing of popular music), eJamming Audiio (playing and recording live with musicians anywhere in the world online), Kompoz (an online music composition community), NINJAM (open source software allowing people to make real music together via the Internet) and LOLA, a music app that uses Internet2, a faster and more efficient version of the Internet used by educational and research facilities.

LOLA, short for “Low Latency”, can be used by collaborating performers and beams music across Internet2 with a latency of 20-50 milliseconds over, which is approximately how long it would take the sound to reach a musician on one side of a stage from a performer on the other. This and the previously mentioned sites have become some of the leading outlets for artists in different parts of the world to compose, remix and re-master their music, many times without even meeting each other in person.

Another such website that allows for instant sharing of music files and the high-speed transfer of recorded sessions is Gobbler.com, a website founded in 2010 Los Angeles entrepreneur California Music Industry Summit. Kantrowitz says he was inspired by an incident in Turkey in 2009 where Lenny Kravitz tried to access a disc drive where he had a song saved, only to learn that the drive was dead. That incident gave him the idea to create a site where artists can back up digital files and collaborate to create songs with other musicians anywhere there is an Internet connection.

Many artists have benefitted vastly from collaborating over the Internet. One such group of artists is Wild Blossoms Band, an all-women Internet band founded by Indian artist Sagarika Deb in December 2010. Phillipino artist Lovelyn Onojah joined Sagarika and thus far they have worked with 25 musicians worldwide, made and published music over the Internet, successfully launched two albums in 2012 on iTunes, Amazon MP3, CD Baby, and Soundcloud, and were recognized by the LIMCA Book of Records 2012 for outstanding achievement in the field of music and by the ASSIST World Record Research Foundation as part of their research on the outstanding achievers.

The online music collaboration space has not only set a new standard for artists to create, collaborate, distribute and share, but it has also become much more competitive. What was once seen as a cutting edge taboo is now commonplace amongst artists of many genres, styles and level of success. As niches continue to become more specified and technology continues to improve, we can be sure to expect better and more sophisticated tools that will make online music collaboration even more vital and mainstream.