Tag Archive: Punk


Don’t know Tunabunny? The band hails from Athens, Georgia as in the home of the famed 40 Watt Club, The B52’s and R.E.M. Tunabunny founders are Scott Creney and Brigette Herron. Along with Mary Jane Hassell and Jesse Stinnard the band has released their fifth album, “PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr”. The album captured us. Taken as a whole (twenty-eight tracks) or on a track-by-track basis, the journey is well worthwhile. Fortunately, Tunabunny found time to talk with us. This is a great band having seemingly unbounded creativity accompanied by a welcome sense of humor!

HVUM: Thanks so much for taking time to talk to us! We’ve read a bit about the background of the band and it sounds like a good story, so tell us how Tunabunny happened and how you came up with the band’s name!

TB: Just some friends getting together to make some noise. None of us were proficient on our instruments, or had ever played in a band before. Scott and Brigette had moved in together and their house, in addition to kind of falling apart, had a lot of space. Her dad played music and brought over a bunch of stuff for them to play around with.

After a couple of months of this, songs started to emerge out of the ether and we began to dream of maybe one day playing a show. The original idea was to have a different name every time we played, but Scott saw a sign on a rural highway that said BUNNYTUNA. We flipped it around because it sounded better and all our friends just kept calling us Tunabunny. Some people hate it, but we think it sounds kind of cute and kind of disturbing, which makes it perfect. Anyway, it’s a better band name than Def Leppard. Or Ed Sheeran.

HVUM: Many of our followers are D.Y.I. musicians, so they are always interested in knowing if band members have formal musical backgrounds or if they are self-taught.

TB: Entirely self-taught. We were totally inspired by all that Raincoats, Kleenex, early Slits stuff. Plus Velvet Undeground, and The Shaggs, and Pere Ubu, and The Clean. All those bands showed what you could do with a couple of chords and a lot of imagination. More locally, bands like Pylon and The B-52’s made us thing you could be weirdo art kids with more inspiration than chops and have fun playing music.

HVUM: Fantastic! We’re absolutely into The Slits (Cut), The Raincoats, Kleenex/Liliput…Knocking on to the last question, we’d like to know how you found your HHBTM or was it that HHBTM found Tunabunny?

TB: After a couple of shows, word got around town that there was this band called Tunabunny that was a cool fucking mess and someone told Mike (owner/ceo/whatever of HHBTM) that he needed to check it out. It took him a couple of tries because he kept showing up after we’d already finished playing (we pride ourselves on punctuality—plus the sooner the show’s over the sooner you can relax and party). Anyway, he signed us right there on the spot. Said he’d never make us stars but he’d let us record whatever we wanted, which is all we could’ve asked for. And we kind of got to become stars anyway—distant stars that you can only see when the planets and atmosphere are properly aligned, but still stars nonetheless. We’ve certainly gone further than we ever expected or dreamed when we started playing together.

HVUM: Your music covers a very large bandwidth of genres from pop to blazing rock and it seems just to say that much of what you do is experimental. Do you have any influences that motivate you or is it more about an independent convergence of creative minds?

TB: The music usually emerges from us playing in a room. Because we listen to and love all kinds of music—from Abba to Sun Ra, from Swell Maps to The Beatles, we don’t put up boundaries around what we can or can’t play. Someone in the band shouts That’s great! Play that again! And a song comes out of it. Given that we live in an age when we have practically the entire history of recorded music at our fingertips, it seems dishonest for a band in 2017 to sound like they’ve only ever heard one record in their entire collective lives. Maybe that’s a good marketing strategy, but it makes for really boring records. And as a band, the only goal we’ve ever had is to not being boring — to ourselves or to our audience.

HVUM: Your new release “PCP Alice in Wonderland Jr” is our pick out of new releases for 23 June. We had a hard time describing the album in the sense of “pinning it down”. We’d really like to know your thoughts on the twenty-eight track album as far as its being topical or thematic?

TB: It’s a concept album about how great we are (I’m half channeling Noel Gallagher and half serious when I say that). There seems to be a lot of politics on this one, personal and otherwise, and a lot of struggling to keep one’s emotional head above water. I hear a lot of ostracism, a sense of loneliness and loss and isolation in the lyrics, with the music kind of pushing back against that. Like the best music, it’s about dancing on the graves of your problems and fears.

HVUM: Let’s take time out for a look and listen to “Incinerate”, the second track on “PCP Alice in Wonderland”.

HVUM: We first learned about the band with the release of “Genius Fatigue” and we like that album…”Duchess For Nothing” gets put on repeat! Has there been any change in direction between “Genius Fatigue” and the new release?

TB: We recorded Genius Fatigue back when we were touring all the time, so it has that kind of attack you get from standing in front of an audience. Being at home more, you tend to pick up different instruments, play around with drum machines, electronics, recording techniques, etc. Plus, the first two albums were us learning to play. Genius Fatigue (third album) was us kind of mastering the form. The only thing to do at that point was unlearn—switching instruments, switching approaches, etc.

HVUM: If Tunabunny was a book, what would it be and why?

TB: That is such a great question…It’s probably going to take longer to answer than all the others combined. Maybe Guy Debord’s autobiography Panegyric. We’ll defer to the publisher’s description of it as a “tongue-in-cheek autobiography [that] mixes precision and pastiche in a whirlwind account of philosophy, exploit, and inebriation. Plus it was original bound in sandpaper so it would erode the covers of the books next to it and most people haven’t heard of it—just like Tunabunny.

HVUM: Finally, what is on the horizon for Tunabunny? Any tours ahead?

TB: We’ve toured a lot over the years—low-budget shoestring DIY touring, but there’s more obstacles now than there used to be. Brigette’s about a year away from finishing her PhD (if all goes according to plan), and there’s a 3-year-old baby bouncing around, and Mary Jane has a real grown-up job and mortgage. That’s not to say we’ll never tour again, but we’d probably need more money than we did in the past, which would mean we’d need to be more popular, something we have no control over. Most likely we’ll be a cult band that gets criminally ignored during our lifetime only to be besieged with offers 20 years from now when we’re cited as incredibly influential, etc. etc. assuming human life exists 20 years from now in any recognizable form of course.

HVUM: Hey! Thanks a lot for spending time to share your experience and thoughts about Tunabunny. We really hope that you can find the time (and the money) to keep going. Don’t hesitate to call on us if we can lend a hand going forward!


Tunabunny
PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr
HHBTM

Visit Tunabunny at Facebook and iTunes

For those who don’t know Tunabunny, the band hails from Athens, Georgia as in the home of the famed 40 Watt Club, The B52’s and R.E.M. Tunabunny founders are Scott Creney and Brigette Herron. Along with Mary Jane Hassell and Jesse Stinnard the band has released their fifth album, “PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr”. It’s tough getting one’s head around the twenty-eight track album and that’s okay, it’s worth setting aside the 1:14:25 to take the journey. You’ll get pop – “Incinerate” (video below), and trip folk (maybe that’s not the right description, but just think in terms an acid trip experience that’s so weird you can’t describe it) – “Seek Consequence”, and punk rock – “Noise Problems”(track below). It’s recommended that you have listen to the album as a whole, which might leave you feeling a bit dazed, but after letting it all register, you can return to take it in bite-sized pieces. Tunabunny is positively avant garde and “PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr” originally unorthodox.


The Coathangers The Coathangers are a punk rock band from Atlanta formed by guitarist and singer Julia Kugel (aka Crook Kid Coathanger), bassist and singer Meredith Franco (aka Minnie Coathanger), and drummer and singer Stephanie Luke (aka Rusty Coathanger). They have toured throughout the U.S. and Europe. In 2007, punk label Die Slaughterhaus Records teamed up with New York’s Rob’s House Records to issuing the band’s self-titled debut album. Their second album, “Scramble”, was released in 2009 by Suicide Squeeze Records followed by “Larceny & Old Lace”, in 2011. The Coathangers released album number four, “Suck My Shirt”, in the spring of 2014 and on April 15, 2016 the band released their fifth studio full-length entitled “Nosebleed Weekend”. which debuted at #149 on the Nielsen Soundscan Top 200 sales charts and #6 on the Top New Artist Albums and #4 on the Alternative New Artist Albums chart. The Coathangers will be on tour in Europe beginning 23 May and they play Paris at Le Batofar on 3 June.

HVUM: Thanks very much for talking with us. We know a lot about the Coathangers, but can you tell about the band’s highlights over the past few years – personal anecdotes included!

C: Over the past few years we’ve been putting the pedal to the metal! Constantly touring including 5 UK/European tours, 2 Australian/New Zealand tours, and countless US/Canadian tours! We also have managed to put out our 5th full length LP and coming up we are releasing a 5 song EP, its a 12″ so on one side we have the 5 songs and on the other side, an etching of artwork by our good friend Helena Darling from Canada! We also have been able to do a bunch of festivals and even got to tour with legendary band, Refused last year.

HVUM: What motivates you as a band? What keeps you going?The Coathangers4

C: I think the main thing that keeps us goin is our love for each other and our love for the band itself as well as all the fans and people we’ve worked with in the industry that have supported us so very much. This isn’t a hobby for us, it’s truly our lives, who we are.

HVUM: Thinking about Hunter S. Thompson’s famous quote,
“The music business is a cruel and shallow money trench, a long plastic hallway where thieves and pimps run free, and good men die like dogs. There’s also a negative side.”

We’re followed by a lot of young women aspiring to working in the music business. Do you agree with Thompson? Any advice you want to pass along to our aspiring readers?

C: That quote! Wow, yes it’s definitely true for a lot of bands , and maybe we’ve been included in this quote before as well, however, like my momma has always said “Nothing worth doing is easy”. Whether it be music or any other passion or profession, you must work hard at it and assume nothing. Me and the girls sometimes say, “Expect the worst, but always hope for the best”.

HVUM: Reviewers have referred to the Coathangers as bridging punk, garage, new wave and classic girl group sounds ( the Ronettes, the Shirelles, the Chiffons , Little Eva, and the Cookies). How do you hear that that mix in your music?

C: That’s amazing, that’s just what we want to hear! On some of our slower songs I definitely take a little bit from the drumming sounds of 50s/60s classic do-wop and we have been inspired by the vocals of the same groups so I’m glad people can hear that.

HVUM: Case in point? Let’s take time out for a look and listen, “Perfume”.

HVUM: Let’s talk punk for just a minute. It’s interesting how – call it a subculture if you want – punk has lived on far beyond the 70’s and Richard Hell and The Voidoids, MC5, The Clash, Iggy & The Stooges, Patti Smith, The Sex Pistols and The Ramones…but as Dorian Lynskey (Guardian) has pointed out it’s not nostalgia that keeps punk alive. Your thoughts?

C: I think that the ideals that punk is based upon continues to stick around because it is in fact a way of thinking, a way of being, living. Thinking for yourself, treating everyone as equals, saying Fuck You to the status quo, fighting for women’s rights, humans rights etc, these are all punk ideals and they aren’t going anywhere. Especially with the way things are in the world now, I think it’s one of the most important times for people to make music, whether punk or not, there’s so much to say, to speak out about, and music is a very real force to be reckoned with.

HVUM: Thinking about your five studio albums, is it fair to say that the Coathangers have been consistent in delivering on a primal anti-establishment, anti-authoritarian ethos?

C: I think we’ve definitely done justice to those ethos, because we are going against sexist, establishment/authoritarian, racist, injustices that surround us all. If you have something to say, say it. However we always want our listeners to think for themselves, just bc we say it doesn’t mean you have to agree, it is just how we feel.

HVUM: Okay, let’s give a listen one more time, “Down Down”.

HVUM: Looking back over the last eleven or so years of hard work as a band, can you identify a “high” point… “low” point? Based on your experience, what works really well for the band and what doesn’t work so well?

C: Ha, the highs and lows are always day to day especially when we are out on the road so much. The highest of highs are those amazing gigs where everything just falls into its place, the lowest of lows are missing out on family and friend affairs back at home I think. What works best for us now is taking small breaks in between tours, treating ourselves to a nice meal from time to time… its the little things….

The Coathangers3HVUM: In putting together a set list, how do you go about deciding what works and what doesn’t?

C: We definitely only have like maybe 2-3 songs out of all of them that work best as the first song! We want the first thing people to hear at our shows, something that really captures their attention and gets the place going! Then after that we just try to equally place the songs going back n forth between all our lead vocals. And not too many slow songs as that tends to bring down the energy.

HVUM: HorizonVU Music advocates for particular social and political causes such as rights for women, LGBT, legalizing of marijuana use. What issues do you feel comfortable taking up as a band?

C: All those things, basic human rights in general, but especially all those mentioned above. We went to the Anti Trump march in Washington DC with my sister and friends and it was the most powerful feeling… being in the presence of so many, all marching against the same injustices, it really does matter to keep fighting against all these awful things…

HVUM: Thinking ahead, suppose that in five years, individually or as a band, you could be anywhere you want doing whatever you want to do. Where you and what are you doing?

C: Doing exactly what we are doing now, maybe playing even bigger venues? As long as we get to keep writing and playing I am happy.

HVUM: Last, outside of music, what do you do for kicks?

C: Go to the movies, hang in the park with my dog, hang with loved ones at home, quite boring eh? Ha

HVUM: Hey, it’s been a real pleasure talking with you. We wish you all the best for your spring – summer tour taking you across Europe and winding up in Knoxville, TN on 5 August. We’ll see you in Paris in a couple of weeks. Meantime, safe travels!

C: Thank you so much

Visit The Coathangers at http://thecoathangers.com/home/


Lexy1Lexy Cassell is a singer/songwriter from Long Island, NY. She mixes pop, rock and punk into her music style. Songs she sings reflect her life philosophy which are to break the norms. Her song Original is about being yourself and is currently played in rotation on several radio stations. It won the people’s choice for most votes in Newsday’s Battle of the Bands contest. Lexy has performed at Jones Beach and local events, fairs, concerts and TV shows. She also enjoys skateboarding and is a sponsored skateboarder, team rider and model for sPACYcLOUd and Skate Girls Tribe. She visits high schools as a teen mentor and has spoken at school assemblies for anti-bullying awareness.

HVUM: How do you describe yourself? What are your key strengths, and generally, where might you like to improve personally?

LC: I’d describe myself as a hard working and resilient. I’ve broken 4 bones skateboarding and I don’t give up easily, I love a challenge. I also enjoy being able to entertain people. I’m always working on improving myself and moving forward, whether it’s olling a 4 step on my board or a new song on the piano. If it’s nice outside I can forget the time and skate all day so trying to manage my time can be hard if I have a few things going on in one day.

HVUM How do you view your family in relation to your wanting a career in music?

LC: Without the support from my family this wouldn’t be possible. My parents drive me to events, coordinate my schedule and pay for Lexy2expenses. They also let the band practice in my basement.

HVUM: Tell us about your background and development in music. When and why did you start playing music? Did you have any formal training?

LC: When I was around 8 I would go into my room and dance around, make music videos and post them on You Tube. When my mother found out I was doing it I thought I might be in trouble but she watched the videos and liked them. She told me she would get me singing lessons if that’s what I wanted to do and she also enrolled me in a local music school.

HVUM: Are there any particular musicians or bands that have influenced you?

LC: Yes, when I was 8 I saw Lady Gaga perform a News Eve show in Miami. I watched her from the hotel balcony and it was that moment I knew I wanted to have a career in music. There are so many artists I enjoy. I love Avril, Britney Alanis, Pink, Gwen Stefani, Evanescence and Paramore just to name a few.

HVUM: Do you think being a female in a rock band is any different than being male? If you think that there are differences, what are they?

Lexy4LC: I don’t look at it that way. I like to be known as myself. Just like when I skateboard I don’t like people to say I’m a good skateboarder for a girl. I’d like to be known as a good skater period. Most of the contest I skate at I’m usually the only girl so I’m use to competing with the guys.

HVUM: When it comes to building your individual brand as an artist or as a band how do you set your objectives and priorities? What are the toughest objectives to achieve?

LC: Part of building my brand is being true to who I am. So it’s pretty easy. I basically just do random Lexy stuff. I believe it’s me just being me. I enjoy making videos goofing around and letting people just get to know me as a person and see who I am, I do what I like and that’s how I feel I can really connect.

HVUM: Thinking about the key elements for your success how you rank Talent, Team support, Technology, Networks and markets, financial support.

LC: Talent is number one and number two is having committed people supporting you. The rest are all equally important.

HVUM: Given that social media (Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest…) are so important how do you deal with the demands of networking online? What do you consider to be the pros and cons of social media as a means for driving success?

LC: I love to use social media as a tool to network.. I recently started going LIVE on Face book *Lexy Cassell and Instagram *Lexyy Cassell. I don’t see too many downfalls so far social media has been very helpful for me. I can book shows and share information and make new friends.
Lexy5
HVUM: Are you ever concerned about your public image or do you expect people to accept you as you are and forget about changing to meet public approval?

LC: Something that’s important to me is to be who you are. I’m happy with being myself. I’m not perfect and I don’t feel pressure to be that way because I try to keep it real. Part of being a skater means my sneakers are a mess my jean have holes and my hair is all over the place. I feel I’m pretty authentic to who I am and it would be hard to change that. I’d look pretty silly in high heels and a dress on a skateboard.

HVUM: Given that you are young, are you ever concerned that your efforts to build a music career will “disconnect” you from your closest peer group (schoolmates, for example)?

LC: Absolutely not. I get what I have to get done during the week. For example school, lessons and band practice. On the weekends if I’m not performing, I have sleepovers, eat out and go to the mall with my squad. During the summer I spend a few weeks at Woodward which is an extreme sports camp for skateboarders, BMX bikers, and cheer.

HVUM: Do you get nervous before you perform in public or does it just come naturally to you?

LC:When I was younger I did. Not now, it’s just what I do and I look forward to doing it.

HVUM: What is your most memorable moment as a musician? Do you have an experience you’d like to forget? Can you tell us about it?

LC: My most memorable moments are when someone special surprises me and comes to one of my shows.

HVUM: What are your primary social causes or interests?

Lexy3
LC: I’m very involved in Autism Awareness and have spent several Sundays playing at a local Café the employs young adults with developmental disabilities. I support Paws of A Cause and Long Island Domestic Violence Awareness. I also helped raise money for Stony Brook Children’s Hospital here on Long Island.

HVUM: Is there anything you’d like to add to the interview? Anything we’ve missed?

LC: Yes. Recently I’ve started a band called ELISA. It stands for East Long Island Skate Agenda. I have an amazing guitarist Andrew Friedman, cool David Wolfsohn on bass and hitting the drums is Peter Leonardo. We all immediately clicked from our first time we played together I think it’s because we’re all skaters.. We have a great vibe and energy and we’re starting to record our own songs, have booked several shows and a TV interview and just love to hang together and be real.
This month I started a job as a DJ on Radio Buzz 101 Real Alternative. I’m on Sunday from12am-2am and my goal is to bring some attention to the hardworking local bands out there.

Lexy, thanks so much for taking time with us! You’ve got a lot of talent and energy to make things happen. We wish you all the very best of luck and success. Let’s stay in contact going forward. Again, thank you.

Visit Lexy at Facebook and YouTube


Crystal Fairy

Crystal Fairy
Crystal Fairy
Ipecac

Visit Crystal Fairy at Facebook and iTunes

Supergroup, Crystal Fairy, was formed in 2016 by Buzz Osborne and Dale Crover of the Melvins, Omar Rodríguez-López of At the Drive-In and the Mars Volta, and Teri Gender Bender of Le Butcherettes. The eleven-track album features head banging cuts such as “Chiseler” as well as more moderate contributions (“Moth Tongue”). Crystal Fairy is the Pick of the Week primarily due to the contributions of Teri Gender Bender whose vocal range and flexibility make for amazing transitions across the scales without grinding the gears. This album is not for everybody. Those with a preference for more moderate or tame genres might find the stoner metal – heavy metal with psychedelic rock and punk – tough going. Hey, to each their own. Take some time to check out the album.


The Regrettes

The Regrettes
Feel Your Feelings Fool!
Warner Bros

Visit The Regrettes at Facebook and iTunes

Led by singer/songwriter Lydia Night, The Regrettes have released “Feel Your Feelings Fool!”, delivering a very high energy punk-pop thwack. Despite the sense of urgency one might feel from the fifteen-track album, the band is led by Lydia Night who does know how to write songs that stick. Night formed the Regrettes with guitarist Genessa Gariano, bassist Sage Nicole, and drummer Maxx Morando in 2015.


Alice Bag_200x200Alice Bag

Alice Bag

Don Giovanni

Punk rock verteran Alice Bag has released her first solo album on the Don Giovanni label. She is a noted musician, author and feminist. The album offers up plenty of rock (“Little Hypocrite”), but there’s also some intelligent pop (“Suburban Home”) and Latin folk-rock (“Incorporeal Life”).

Visit Alice Bag at Facebook and iTunes.

Sue Rynski is a cult photographer with roots in the punk rock era.

She grew up immersed in the high-energy music and underground rock scene of her hometown, Detroit. This loud, physical, emotional music took hold and became a part of her. From 1977, fine arts diploma in hand, she began hanging out and doing her own art in the company of her friends Destroy All Monsters.

During this period she honed her personal vision: provocative, shocking, beautiful, erotic and joyful.

The essence of rock and roll continues to be her inspiration: “Taking photographs is very physical for me. I thrive on feeling the music, the passion, the movement and in being in motion myself, and also the experience of joy and freedom that rock inspires in all of us.”

Sue goes to “get” her fine art photos in intimate, edgy rock scenes. Her limited edition works are exhibited internationally, notably at the prestigious Rencontres d’Arles photography festival in 2010, as well as in Tokyo, and as part of the travelling exhibition “Destroy All Monsters: Hungry For Death” and more.

She also accepts commissioned work.

www.suerynski.com
https://www.facebook.com/SueRynski
Agency for licensing of stock photos: www.dalle.fr  bertrand.alary@dalle.fr

From 1978-1983 Bookie’s Club 870, a former art deco supper club in decline became the epicenter for our very own creative community of pre- and punk rock bands, artists and enthusiasts in Detroit. Formerly know as Frank Gagen’s (see the façade photo), it became known as Bookie’s when taken over by a bookmaker nicknamed “Bookie.” The club soon became a venue for local underground concerts every night of the week…

Bookie’s Club 870 façade, Detroit, circa 1980. Signed numbered edition of 15 + 2 artist's proofs

“End of the Night, Bookie’s Club 870” is probably the most emblematic of my photographs. It says much about how we enjoyed the time and the place. Beer bottles broken and cigarette butts on the floor under the bar – not from violence but from sheer ecstatic fun and release… The photo is a double exposure (directly on the film) of a girl with an angelic face… Trashy and beautiful, dirty and innocent.

SueRynski-Rynski_024_EndoftheNight-web_small

End of the Night, Bookie’s Club 870, 1978. Signed numbered edition of 15 + 2 artist’s proofs

Reminds me of a song from that time by Detroit’s legendary Sonic’s Rendezvous Band, “Detroit Tango.” “Oh my lady on the floor, I’m watching you dance…” That’s Fred Sonic Smith singing about his girlfriend and future wife, Patti Smith…

Hear the song: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=642ct0ikfBQ


What’s The Buzz ?


Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved


by student organizers at Paris School of Business and l’Institut d’Études Supérieures des Arts (IESA) for the Sue Rynski Photography Exhibition 11 July 2012, 7th July – 31st August 2012, Café Artistique l’Apostrophe

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

The chaotic, frenetic scene of the punk rock musicians, young spectators along with their fresh anger, distant dreams and “raw power”, are all freeze-framed in Sue’s black-and-white camera. The legendary godfather and godmother of the punk rock music Iggy Pop and the Stooges and Patti Smith appear under Rynski’s lens as subversive members among the crowds instead of rock n’ roll superstars . Rynski tends to capture people without including their heads in the photographs. In this way, by neglecting their identities, she successfully records the cultural background vividly without being overshined by those
notorious figures.

The distorted composition created by Sue Rynski embodies Movements are involved in the static, two-dimensional images with the suffusing cigarette smoke, jumping up-and down musicians and howling spectators. Furthermore, the black-and-white photographs now demonstrate a certain quality of “retrospect” which coordinates perfectly with the status quo of punk rock music — the “vintage come-back”. Comparing Rynski’s art works with others from that period of time, people identify her art works from the specific content focusing on underground rock n’ roll performances and revelry of the youth. Moreover, the black-and-white feature as well as the “no-head” shoot also brings immediate recognition to Rynski’s works. Finally, certain “coolness” conveyed from Rynski’s photographs could be another measurement.

The first institution that Rynski attended could be identified as the city of Detroit. Immersing in the “high energy, physical, emotional” music, Rynski

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

took in this type of music so that the energy from the music will later poured out onto her photography. Later, she moved to Paris and learned photography at the American Center for students and artists in Paris. This was the footstone for her to clearly realize her passion towards photography and to hone the multifarious skills to become a professional photographer. After moving back to the U.S. and continuing her education at University of Michigan School of Art, Rynski graduated not only as an energetic photographer, but also as a sensitive, creative artist. These educational “institutions” molded and inspired the photographer to march forward to the images that she longed to make.

On the other hand, on the other side of the business, a group of cultural “institutions” also contributed to her career by promoting her as a productive witness of the 70s and the chaotic music or political movement in America. In 2004, the Patti Smith Archive at Mills College published a collection including Rynski’s photographic works with Patti Smith and her husband Fred Sonic Smith featured in it. In 2005, the exhibition “Sue Rynski, Rock and Roll Ecstasy” was held in her hometown of Detroit.

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

Photo © Sue Rynski All Rights Reserved

In 2006, the Zamiang Gallery in Tokyo held an exhibition for the release of Sue’s first monography “hysteric fifteen” and the launch of her photo t shirts collection by Hysteric Glamour. Paris Université VII Jussieu invited her for lectures and the exhibition “Detroit Rock & Roll Haute Enérgie” in 2007. She also participated in the Art Basel Miami in 2008, and in 2009, she had works included in the “Destroy All Monsters – Hungry For Death” exhibition which traveled to New York, Minneapolis, London and Oslo. In 2010, her work was consecrated at the Rencontres d’Arles Photography Festival, the most prestigious art photography festival in the world, as part of the exhibition “I Am a Cliché – Echoes of the Punk Aesthetic.” Prestigious cultural media such as France Culture and Arte have interviewed her.

Although Rynski intends to blur the identifications of her objects in the photographs, important figures from the punk rock movement also make her works known by the world. These significant musicians include Patti Smith, MC5, Iggy Pop and the Stooges, Destroy All Monsters and so on and so forth. Due to her well-known subjects or “objects” (in this case, the people in Rynski’s photos) no matter the location of where her works are being exhibited, her photographs are decontextualized.

Sue Rynski’s photos are on exhibit through 31 August at Café Artistique l’Apostrophe, 23 rue de La Grange Aux Belles 75010 Paris, France.

Visit Sue Rynski Photography at http://www.suerynski.com/

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