Tag Archive: Rock


Goat Girl
Goat Girl
Rough Trade

Rough Trade always seems to be on the cutting edge whether it be rock, post-punk, garage, alternative…and now we have London-based Goat Girl, aka Clottie Cream, Naima Jelly, L.E.D., and Rosy Bones. The band’s debut album is hard to pigeonhole as there’s some post-punk mixed in with twists from the dark side (Siouxsie and the Banshees) and even a twinge of country. Goat Girl’s debut release has guts and it’s certain that they’re just beginning.

Visit Goat Girl at Facebook and iTunes


Screaming Females
All at Once
Don Giovanni

Visit Screaming Females at Facebook and iTunes

Screaming Females, Marissa Paternoster (guitar vocal), Mike Abbate (bass) and Jarrett Dougherty (drums) have once again teamed with producer Matt Bayles on the group’s seventh album. “All at Once” follows the 2015 release “Rose Mountain” with a more mature recording showing off the ability to cover a broad space in terms of genres and diversity ranging from the pop-punk “I’ll Make You Sorry” to the weighty and thunderous opening track “Glass House”. Covering a broad space is not intended to suggest that there’s room to take a leisurely sonic walk. There’s plenty of movement from start to finish. Screaming Females has successfully stretched the idea of post-punk showing off experience and confidence without losing the dynamics, passion and outright force that put them on the music map.


Hollie Cook
Vessel of Love
Merge

Visit Hollie Cook at Facebook and iTunes

We’ve zeroed in on Hollie Cook’s third album, “Vessel of Love” as this week’s pick. Whether you want to categorize Cook’s work as roots, rock, reggae, or “tropical pop”, it really doesn’t matter. Her enticing vocals are very smooth and creamy making this release every bit worth adding to your collection. You can have a look and listen to “Survive” posted below, but there are other outstanding tracks. In particular, check out “Stay Alive” and “Lunar Addiction”. Producer Youth (Martin Glover) worked on the album bringing his exceptional competence with dub and electronic music. Go for it!


The Willowz
Fifth
Thrill Me

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California-based garage punk rock band, The Willowz, is back with more of their trademark fusion of punkrock and blues. The trio of Richie James Follin (Vocals and Guitar), Jessica Anne Reynoza (Bass Guitar and Vocals) and Loren Shane Humphrey (drums) haven’t lost their edge and in comparison to previous work, Follin has done a most sound-worthy job of getting the mix to the next level. The album takes off with melodious and catching “Don’t Let Them See” and “Never Let You Go” at just under two minutes offers up a brilliant adrenaline rush. The final track “Lily” is an achievement of richness bolstered by instrumental (string) embellishment. Not to take away from the sheer enjoyment of listening to the album, but you might want to put on a set of high-end earphones and pay attention to the technical work on this contribution.


Black Honey is a forcible indie rock band fronted by Izzy Baxter whose powerful, yet dreamy vocals captivate audiences. The Brighton-based band’s members are Izzy Baxter, guitarist Chris Ostler, bass player Tommy Taylor, and drummer Tom Dewhurst. HorizonVU first got to know Black Honey at their Paris performance in January and the band’s videos have been repeated posted on our social media pages. Black Honey performs Tuesday, 19 September at Paris’ Supersonic. We’re fortunate to have caught up with Izzy prior to the 19th show.

HVUM: Hey, first off, thanks for your time. Let‘s start by talking about one of the band’s power songs that resonates with fans. What can you tell us about “Corrine”? How did it come together?

IB: Corrine is about honouring both friendship and fuck ups equally.

HVUM: We know Black Honey is a Brighton-based band and that you, Chris Ostler, Tommy Taylor and Tom Dewhurst have known each other for a fairly long time. We don’t know very much about you apart from the band. What’s a side of you that most people don’t know about? Give us a run-down on Izzy.

IB: I am a creative so I love to paint and draw. In my free time I give my friends stick and poke tattoos or go around charity shops looking for cool weird things and cult movies. I’m writing a poetry book too, though I think that’s something very typical of me.

HVUM: Did you deliberately point your life’s compass toward music or was it more happenstance?

IB: It was kind of both, I had to work really hard to learn the more technical side of music. I am a slow learner, dyslexic and pretty much have no rhythm. But was completely mesmerised with the emotional draw it had on people and I have always been a very determined person.
It was really no other way for me.


HVUM: There’s a photo of you on Facebook in a jacket with “Problem Child” on the back. Are you really a problem child? How so?

IB: yeah, I’m fucked up. I think that’s ok though, I think everyone is a little fucked up really.

HVUM: Generally, what motivates or inspires you?

IB: I guess it’s all about figuring out the world around me by exploring myself and my surroundings. Artistically I love Andy Warhol, cult movies, seeing the world with my band. I like weird things like guitar tones that conjure memory or beats that feel fierce or twisted.

HVUM: When you perform, what do you want your audience to feel?

IB: I want them to forget all of their worries for a moment.

HVUM: Let’s have a listen to another Black Honey power song, “Headspin”.

HVUM: Critics have praised the song and framing it as Lynchian, meaning something like an uncomfortable sense that you’re in someone else’s dream; the familiar becomes elusive and dark in a weird sort of way. Your view on the song?

IB: yeah that’s pretty spot on, I guess through exploring this weird dark swaying romance I find the colours and the lights in a more honest but complicated way.

HVUM: Technical question…As far as gear is concerned, we see you with the Squier J Mascis Jazzmaster. What do you like about it?

IB: I like that it sounds great, has a tremelo arm, really nice tones on both ends of the pick up switch, it’s light, cheap and sturdy so I can throw it across the stage as much as I want.

HVUM: Finally, if you could be invisible for a day, what would you do?

IB: I think it would be quite fun to push Trump down the stairs or maybe pull his trousers down during his next rally.

Izzy, thanks very much for meeting us. We look forward to seeing you, Chris, Tommy,and Tom on 19 September. We’ll be there in force and for our Paris followers know that Black Honey will be back in Paris 31 October opening for Royal Blood. Well done!



L.A. Witch is Sade Sanchez, Irita Pai and Ellie English. The L.A. based band charcterizes it’s sound as “reverb-soaked punked out rock” which is certainly accurate, but fails to capture what is reasonably the darker side of their sound. It is the ghostly or unreal and other-worldly dimension of the band’s tracks that gives the listener cause to think of witches, although the band does not connect into the beliefs or practices assoiciated with witchcraft. Interestingly, the band’s work has been referred to in context of the surreal and disconnected apprehension associated with works of David Lynch. So, whether you connect with the band’s post-apocalyptic groove (desert punk) or the more raucous garage rock, L.A. Witch is a band you do not want to ignore. The band is on tour in Europe and will be in Paris 16 September at Batofar.

Thanks to the support of manager, Andrew Rossiter of the Hooley Group, we caught up with drummer Ellie English getting a better view into the world of L.A. Witch.

HVUM: Hi Ellie. Thanks for taking time out to speak with us. How did L.A. Witch happen? How did the three of you meet up and decide to become a band?

ELLIE: I met Sade in High school and we had a 2-piece band together. After our departing we met up a few years later when L.A. Witch was looking for a drummer. I’ve been in the band 4 of the 6 years the band has been together.

HVUM: What do you most hope to bring to the music scene and to your followers?

ELLIE: I just want people to enjoy themselves.

HVUM: Your music has been put into the context of a marriage connecting 60’s girls-in-the-garage charm and David Lynch’s surreal

Ellie English

exposés of Southern California underbelly. This sounds like a declaration of raw energy coming to life in someone else’s dream. Is it a meaningful way to think about your work? How so (or not so)?

ELLIE: I see it as something we enjoy and we play what we are inspired by.

HVUM: You have an upcoming album release – self-titled “L.A. Witch”. Who have you been working with and how have the collaborations influenced the album?

ELLIE: I really miss the raw sound that we have live. It’s been very hard feeling to capture.

HVUM: Yeah, for sure. While it does not capture the live delivery, let’s take a look and listen to what might come closest, the official live video version of “Kill My Baby Tonight”.

HVUM: Do you worry about the market – meaning where your music will end up and how it will be heard? Do you grow and evolve detached from commercial concerns?

ELLIE: It will end up where it ends up. One thing I’ve learned about touring is that lots of bands sound very different from recordings than they do live.

HVUM: Considering your live performances, what works especially well for the band? What is your worst nightmare (experience)?

ELLIE: Worst nightmare-Acoustic performances.

HVUM: Thanks, Ellie for your time. we’re looking forward to seeing you, Sade and Irita on 16 September and we encourage our followers to add L.A. Witch to their collections!


INHEAVEN
INHEAVEN
PIAS

Visit INHEAVEN at Facebook and iTunes

INHEAVEN are a four-piece alternative rock band from South London with members Chloe Little (bass, vocals), James Taylor (vocals, guitar), Joe Lazarus (drums) and Jake Lucas (guitar). There’s just no other way to say it, but this debut album rocks big time! Yes, there’s some shoegaze, but it’s artfully blended with dominant rock and grunge, so it’s certainly not more dream pop and you won’t get sucked into dreamblends of undifferentiated sounds (of which the market offers plenty). The opening track, “Baby’s Alright” offers up an excellent up to now/then statement on American culture which is surely enough to get Mr. Trump raging away on Twitter. Politics aside (not possible, really), it’s a rocker brought to accentuated heights by Joe’s drums, Chole’s bassline, and buzzed guitars. And while there’s been a lot said about the tracks “Bitter Town” and “Regeneration” (neither should be ignored), there’s still a preference here for the uncontrolled agitation of the band’s debut single, “Bitter Town”. Add the album to your collection for it’s social sensitivity and fanfuckingtastic alt-rock.


A must read…Joe Coscarelli, New York Times…
“Rock’s Not Dead, It’s Ruled By Women: The Round-Table Conversation”

“…as we’ve spoken among ourselves about the music that most excites us, we have consistently marveled at how much outstanding rock music is being made by female and non-binary performers who work just below the surface of the mainstream.”

A special multimedia presentation of this story will appear online Tuesday at nytimes.com/music.


The Lovely Bad Things
Teenage Grown Ups
Burger Records

Visit The Lovely Bad Things at Facebook and iTunes

The Lovely Bad Things have released their second album, “Teenage Grownups”, so brace yourself for exceptionally energetic rock-punk-garage. The Lovely Bad Things is brothers Camron (guitar, vocals) and Brayden Ward (drums, vocals), Lauren Curtius (guitar, vocals), Tim Hatch (guitar) and Wesley Baxter (bass). The album opens with a frantic “I’ll Listen” that’s sure to wake you up and keep you listening. The album’s title track “Teenage Grown Ups” is next up and if you’re young and anxious for the future or if you’ve already joined the masses of disillusioned adult office workers, this song has to resonate. But either way join the band in keeping your sense of humour (check out the video). You can slow down a bit with “Cartoon Food”. You gotta love the “woo-woos”! “I Just Want You To Go Away” shows that while the songs are often quite amusing and melodious, the band can also slap you…

“I’m not gonna hide
But honey, you better
Get on a bus go downtown
Get a life

And the boys that hear you sobbing– don’t give a shit
I don’t know what I’m searching for– but I know that you’re not it
Where have you been all my life?– so I know where you can stay
I don’t know what I want anymore– I just want you to go away”

Go ahead and download “Teenage Grown Ups” and enjoy. If it doesn’t make your day better, well sorry, “Get a life”!


Don’t know Tunabunny? The band hails from Athens, Georgia as in the home of the famed 40 Watt Club, The B52’s and R.E.M. Tunabunny founders are Scott Creney and Brigette Herron. Along with Mary Jane Hassell and Jesse Stinnard the band has released their fifth album, “PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr”. The album captured us. Taken as a whole (twenty-eight tracks) or on a track-by-track basis, the journey is well worthwhile. Fortunately, Tunabunny found time to talk with us. This is a great band having seemingly unbounded creativity accompanied by a welcome sense of humor!

HVUM: Thanks so much for taking time to talk to us! We’ve read a bit about the background of the band and it sounds like a good story, so tell us how Tunabunny happened and how you came up with the band’s name!

TB: Just some friends getting together to make some noise. None of us were proficient on our instruments, or had ever played in a band before. Scott and Brigette had moved in together and their house, in addition to kind of falling apart, had a lot of space. Her dad played music and brought over a bunch of stuff for them to play around with.

After a couple of months of this, songs started to emerge out of the ether and we began to dream of maybe one day playing a show. The original idea was to have a different name every time we played, but Scott saw a sign on a rural highway that said BUNNYTUNA. We flipped it around because it sounded better and all our friends just kept calling us Tunabunny. Some people hate it, but we think it sounds kind of cute and kind of disturbing, which makes it perfect. Anyway, it’s a better band name than Def Leppard. Or Ed Sheeran.

HVUM: Many of our followers are D.Y.I. musicians, so they are always interested in knowing if band members have formal musical backgrounds or if they are self-taught.

TB: Entirely self-taught. We were totally inspired by all that Raincoats, Kleenex, early Slits stuff. Plus Velvet Undeground, and The Shaggs, and Pere Ubu, and The Clean. All those bands showed what you could do with a couple of chords and a lot of imagination. More locally, bands like Pylon and The B-52’s made us thing you could be weirdo art kids with more inspiration than chops and have fun playing music.

HVUM: Fantastic! We’re absolutely into The Slits (Cut), The Raincoats, Kleenex/Liliput…Knocking on to the last question, we’d like to know how you found your HHBTM or was it that HHBTM found Tunabunny?

TB: After a couple of shows, word got around town that there was this band called Tunabunny that was a cool fucking mess and someone told Mike (owner/ceo/whatever of HHBTM) that he needed to check it out. It took him a couple of tries because he kept showing up after we’d already finished playing (we pride ourselves on punctuality—plus the sooner the show’s over the sooner you can relax and party). Anyway, he signed us right there on the spot. Said he’d never make us stars but he’d let us record whatever we wanted, which is all we could’ve asked for. And we kind of got to become stars anyway—distant stars that you can only see when the planets and atmosphere are properly aligned, but still stars nonetheless. We’ve certainly gone further than we ever expected or dreamed when we started playing together.

HVUM: Your music covers a very large bandwidth of genres from pop to blazing rock and it seems just to say that much of what you do is experimental. Do you have any influences that motivate you or is it more about an independent convergence of creative minds?

TB: The music usually emerges from us playing in a room. Because we listen to and love all kinds of music—from Abba to Sun Ra, from Swell Maps to The Beatles, we don’t put up boundaries around what we can or can’t play. Someone in the band shouts That’s great! Play that again! And a song comes out of it. Given that we live in an age when we have practically the entire history of recorded music at our fingertips, it seems dishonest for a band in 2017 to sound like they’ve only ever heard one record in their entire collective lives. Maybe that’s a good marketing strategy, but it makes for really boring records. And as a band, the only goal we’ve ever had is to not being boring — to ourselves or to our audience.

HVUM: Your new release “PCP Alice in Wonderland Jr” is our pick out of new releases for 23 June. We had a hard time describing the album in the sense of “pinning it down”. We’d really like to know your thoughts on the twenty-eight track album as far as its being topical or thematic?

TB: It’s a concept album about how great we are (I’m half channeling Noel Gallagher and half serious when I say that). There seems to be a lot of politics on this one, personal and otherwise, and a lot of struggling to keep one’s emotional head above water. I hear a lot of ostracism, a sense of loneliness and loss and isolation in the lyrics, with the music kind of pushing back against that. Like the best music, it’s about dancing on the graves of your problems and fears.

HVUM: Let’s take time out for a look and listen to “Incinerate”, the second track on “PCP Alice in Wonderland”.

HVUM: We first learned about the band with the release of “Genius Fatigue” and we like that album…”Duchess For Nothing” gets put on repeat! Has there been any change in direction between “Genius Fatigue” and the new release?

TB: We recorded Genius Fatigue back when we were touring all the time, so it has that kind of attack you get from standing in front of an audience. Being at home more, you tend to pick up different instruments, play around with drum machines, electronics, recording techniques, etc. Plus, the first two albums were us learning to play. Genius Fatigue (third album) was us kind of mastering the form. The only thing to do at that point was unlearn—switching instruments, switching approaches, etc.

HVUM: If Tunabunny was a book, what would it be and why?

TB: That is such a great question…It’s probably going to take longer to answer than all the others combined. Maybe Guy Debord’s autobiography Panegyric. We’ll defer to the publisher’s description of it as a “tongue-in-cheek autobiography [that] mixes precision and pastiche in a whirlwind account of philosophy, exploit, and inebriation. Plus it was original bound in sandpaper so it would erode the covers of the books next to it and most people haven’t heard of it—just like Tunabunny.

HVUM: Finally, what is on the horizon for Tunabunny? Any tours ahead?

TB: We’ve toured a lot over the years—low-budget shoestring DIY touring, but there’s more obstacles now than there used to be. Brigette’s about a year away from finishing her PhD (if all goes according to plan), and there’s a 3-year-old baby bouncing around, and Mary Jane has a real grown-up job and mortgage. That’s not to say we’ll never tour again, but we’d probably need more money than we did in the past, which would mean we’d need to be more popular, something we have no control over. Most likely we’ll be a cult band that gets criminally ignored during our lifetime only to be besieged with offers 20 years from now when we’re cited as incredibly influential, etc. etc. assuming human life exists 20 years from now in any recognizable form of course.

HVUM: Hey! Thanks a lot for spending time to share your experience and thoughts about Tunabunny. We really hope that you can find the time (and the money) to keep going. Don’t hesitate to call on us if we can lend a hand going forward!


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