Tag Archive: womeninmusic



by Clara Zicaro

Clara is a Parisiennne working with the HorizonVU team. She is studies communications and intends to pursue the Master of Business degree. She is fluent in French, Italian, German and English. She is passionate about music, dance and the performing arts. She studies viola, voice-singing and she is a contemporary dancer at the Conservatoire La Garenne.


One year after her first single “La loi de Murphy”, Angèle published her first album “Brol” last 5th October.

Angèle was soaked in art and especially music since her early childhood. Her father, Marka is a well-known singer in Belgium. Her mother is the actress Laurence Bibot and her brother is the famous rapper Roméo Elvis. Inspired by Ella Fitzgerald and Hélène Ségara, Angèle has a classical and jazz piano background. She is an author, composer and performer and will seduce you with her pure and delicate voice. Her songs are based on humor, mockery and stand back. Her lyrics are characterized by their simplicity.

Let’s discover her latest video clip: « Tout oublier » in collaboration with his brother Roméo Elvis.

To know more about Brol check out

« Brol » means mess or Capernaum in Belgian argot. “I wanted to put a Belgian word in my album, even more that it always makes me laugh. The “brol” is a mess, an optimistic and light disorder, it is not at all pejorative” explained Angèle. “This word makes me remember my childhood, my country because I am there less and less. I found it really reassuring”

The « Brol », is our state of brain after listening to her album and trying to find one musical genre fitting Angèles’ songs. In “Nombreux” we heard the piano and her voice. “La Thune” is a pop and sometimes reggae song. “Tout oublier” is a rap and “Flou” includes an electro part.

Main themes of “Brol”

The main themes of this album are: social networks and narcissism which are developed in “”Victime des réseaux” and “La Thune”. Then, love, introspection and melancholy are also current topics (in “Les matoins”). In “Nombreux”, the piano gives a romantic melody. “Ta reine” highlights the feminism homosexuality.

Sally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Singing As A Rhythm Instrument
by Sally

My singing student Sharon is a drummer. However, her knowledge of drumming and feeling the beat has not yet translated into her singing.

I found this very curious until I realized that she was not using her lyrics rhythmically. She was not saying the lyrics clearly and precisely nor was she saying them on the beat. There was very little energy in how she sang the lyrics.

It’s amazing how much Sharon’s pitch and tone quality improved when she used the lyrics as a rhythm instrument. The improvements in pitch and tone happen because of the attention to clarity and precision of rhythm – plus the new infusion of energy. The she had to listen more closely and get deeper into the music.

The following is the sequence we used in her lesson to get Sharon thinking about the lyrics as rhythm.

1. Speak the lyrics in rhythm clapping with each syllable.
2. Speak the lyrics in rhythm clapping on the beat.
3. Speak the lyrics using consonants to define the rhythm.
4. Sing the lyrics using consonants to define the rhythm.

Yes, the rhythm is in the consonants. Vowels do not have a rhythmic function in singing. We sustain pitch on vowels but we do not create rhythm with vowels. As one of the Sing Like You Speak phrase exercises – commercial for your vocal technique – states, “I sing on the vowels but I get paid for the consonants!”

Consonants define our communication. Consonants are the action of our words. When used with an understanding of rhythm, they can also define the rhythm in a song.

Listen to Jason Mraz. He uses his singing voice as a rhythm instrument. Listen to how he uses his consonants to highlight the rhythm. Plus you can understand every word he sings!

It’s helpful to get to know the potential of each of the consonant sounds and their rhythmic quality. Play around with lazy diction and then over articulating. Careful not to distort your mouth movements when over articulating. Allow yourself a generous opening inhale to activate the low abdominal muscles that are the power behind your consonants.

Different consonants have different qualities. Not just sound quality but also tonal quality. Their percussive impact and use are also slightly different one from the other.

P’s are good to Pounce on the beat
B’s bounce on the beat
T’s articulate pitch well and end words cleanly
S’s get you through the beginning consonant to land on the beat with the vowel
K sounds are sharp
R’s bounce from the R to vowel
F’s clear the way for a strong vowel
M and N are softer more elongated consonants and yet when you listen to the Jason Mraz song he uses his N’s very effectively as rhythmic definition.

Check it out right now using these phrases from Fly Me To The Moon. Play around by varying the percussive use of the consonants. You will notice how the meaning of the lyrics morphs with your articulation.

Fly me to the moon
And let me play among the stars
Let me see what spring is like
On Jupiter and Mars

There are endless variations to how you can articulate and punctuate rhythm. This means that there are endless ways for you to make the song purely your own.

Sing Like You Speak(TM) candle exercises thoroughly embed the muscle memory needed to use your consonants in a powerful way. Get Sing Like You Speak(TM) Power Exercises to learn how.

Have fun! Fill the air with your singing. Music is our best hope for a peaceful planet.

Angie Joseph: New Project, New Music, New Goals – “October Rain” Rockin’ 2018

by Clara Zicarco

Paris-based singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist, Angie Joseph talks with HorizonVU’s Clara Zicaro about her new project and new music. Visit October Rain at October Rain. Listen to the acoustic version of “In The Middle” on SoundCloud. Photo Credit (below): *ThéOdora *Sabath* Shoot* at Facebook

*ThéOdora *Sabath* Shoot*

Let’s discover Angie Joseph

CZ: Tell us more about your musical career?
I sing and play different instruments such as guitar and bass. I have been in different bands since I’m 16. My last band was called Under The Skin and is essentially composed of two peoples, my close friend Yan and me, we composed the songs, the other members were interpret. I have now decided to start my first solo project under the name of « October rain ». I didn’t want to put my real name on it.

CZ: When will your EP be released?
It will be released in September, although we expect a singles release in July. My songs have just been mixed in England.

CZ: Have you received some help from musicians for your project?
Yes, my friend Tarah G. Carpenter (Tarah Who?), is the drummer for my songs. She is currently in Los Angeles.

CZ: Why do you sing in English?
In my opinion, when you sing Rock music, it is better to use English rather than French.

CZ: Is music your main activity?
Music isn’t my principal job, I am currently a communication and graphism officer.

CZ: What do you sing about in your songs?
In my songs, I talk about what I feel, about what a person makes me feel or about inspired topics. I do not have limitations for writing, as I am alone in my project, I do not have to convince anyone. I will now try to go in further reflexion about the society in my music. When I was in a band, writing was always about generality, to better fit to everyone.

CZ: Where and how do you find your inspiration to write songs?
It really depends to each tune. Sometimes the melody comes in my mind, then I transcribe it in a partition. I can find inspiration by playing with my guitar. Sometimes it happens that I first find the lyric, then the melody.

CZ: Roughly, how many concerts have you done? Do you prefer huge or small rooms?
I think I have done between 100 and 200 concerts in 15 years. It is really hard to perform in the first part of a concert. The challenge is to grab the attention of the audience.

CZ: Who are your favorite artists?
There are a lot, for example: Tool, Queens of the stone age, Foo fighters, Radiohead, Royal Blood, Brody Dalle, Dead Sara, Deap Vally, Imogen Heap, Rival Sons, PJ Harvey, Dry Can, Tarah Who? and Pink.

CZ: How do you describe your music?
The sound is raw, simple, effective, no frills, minimalist. It’s rock, it’s pop, it’s alternative rock.

CZ: Thanks a lot for your time. We look forward to the EP release and more from October Rain.

Sally_newsfeedSally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

What Is Singing? Seriously. What Do You Think?
by Sally

Your body is smarter than your mind. Your body is your singing instrument. So why does singing seem to be so difficult? Sing Like You Speak™ is here to teach you it ain’t necessarily so.

Breathing is completely natural. You are reading this, so your breathing is working – you are alive.

And yet when it comes to singing, we second-guess or even doubt the body’s natural ability. We actually override nature by overthinking the process and relying on the mind to ‘figure it out’ instead of trusting the natural process of breathing and phonation. We actually invite the mind to participate in a perfectly natural process.

Does this sound familiar?

You take an inhale and you immediately think, that isn’t enough air to get through the phrase! So you push and pull at the muscles of your abdomen to “help” your singing process.

But guess what? You run out of breath even faster!

That’s what happens when you take a subconscious process – breathing – and make it a conscious process.

The purpose of your inhale is to open the whole instrument. It is to open your resonators, release the jaw and larynx and open all the way down to the lower back and abdominal muscles, thus activating those powerful muscles that will naturally work to propel breath and sound easily through your open instrument.

When I was developing Sing Like You Speak™ my contemporary vocal technique, I could not ignore the fact that singing is natural. And if singing is natural and breathing is natural – what makes singing so difficult?

Makes singing difficult…

Voice teachers who tell you to manipulate and force the physical instrument
Trying to imitate most singers recorded after 1997 where the singer has been recorded (first was Roy Vedas Fragments of Life) and then a sound engineer has manipulated the voice for better pitch, tone quality, rhythm. You are not listening to a voice but to an electronically altered sound that cannot be imitated by the human instrument.
Myths or false thoughts about the effort involved in singing
Trusting the mind and not the body
Sing Like You Speak™ always uses the natural physiological process for simple, healthy signing. Your inhale is to open the instrument. Done right, releases the jaw, tongue and larynx, opens resonators and activates the very intelligent low abdominal and back muscles. That sound like a lot to do but it can be achieve with one thought.

When I have new voice students who has studied voice with another teacher in the past there’s always a conversation that goes something like this.

Student: That’s it? That’s all you do to inhale?

Sally: Absolutely! A simple opening inhale.

Student: But how do I get enough air to sing a long phrase or to sustain a pitch?

Sally: With a simple opening inhale. It seems you want to feel how much effort you are using to breathe.

Student: Of course. The effort tells me that I’ve gotten a good inhale.

Sally: Aren’t you taking lessons to learn how your singing can be effortless?

Student: Well, I didn’t really believe that it could be easy. My last teacher taught me to push out on the inhale and pull in like crazy to exhale.

Sally: Yes, that’s typical old-school teaching. Let’s experiment with a simple, opening inhale.

First step is a simple, opening inhale…

Align your instrument collarbones wide, head on top of the body
Release the jaw and tongue
Feel as though you are opening your instrument all the way to your bottom
Blow the breath out and simply observe how the abdominal and lower back muscles are working – just observe to not interfere.
Use the above breathing process for our experiment proving how brilliant the body can be. No pushing or pulling of belly muscle allowed!

Experiment 1

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying an FFFFFF
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 2

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying a VVVVV (be a motorcycle)
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 3

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale saying a ZZZZZ (be a bumble bee)
Observe what muscles are working

Experiment 4

Perform a simple opening inhale as described above
Exhale sighing an MMMMM
Observe what muscles are working
What did you observe?

If you were able to perform the simply opening inhale then with each experiment you felt a different set of muscles working. The physical intelligence of your instrument chose which muscles to use. Your physical intelligence simply knows what to do. Your mind cannot possibly figure out how to use different muscles for different consonant sounds.

I love the fact that my physical intelligence takes over the singing process when I allow it to. Taking the process out of my mind and putting it into the body where it belongs lets me focus on the music, on phrasing, on character, on enjoying the massive vibration of my sound and having a blast doing so!

Click here for the best voice lessons on the web!


Don’t know Tunabunny? The band hails from Athens, Georgia as in the home of the famed 40 Watt Club, The B52’s and R.E.M. Tunabunny founders are Scott Creney and Brigette Herron. Along with Mary Jane Hassell and Jesse Stinnard the band has released their fifth album, “PCP Presents Alice in Wonderland Jr”. The album captured us. Taken as a whole (twenty-eight tracks) or on a track-by-track basis, the journey is well worthwhile. Fortunately, Tunabunny found time to talk with us. This is a great band having seemingly unbounded creativity accompanied by a welcome sense of humor!

HVUM: Thanks so much for taking time to talk to us! We’ve read a bit about the background of the band and it sounds like a good story, so tell us how Tunabunny happened and how you came up with the band’s name!

TB: Just some friends getting together to make some noise. None of us were proficient on our instruments, or had ever played in a band before. Scott and Brigette had moved in together and their house, in addition to kind of falling apart, had a lot of space. Her dad played music and brought over a bunch of stuff for them to play around with.

After a couple of months of this, songs started to emerge out of the ether and we began to dream of maybe one day playing a show. The original idea was to have a different name every time we played, but Scott saw a sign on a rural highway that said BUNNYTUNA. We flipped it around because it sounded better and all our friends just kept calling us Tunabunny. Some people hate it, but we think it sounds kind of cute and kind of disturbing, which makes it perfect. Anyway, it’s a better band name than Def Leppard. Or Ed Sheeran.

HVUM: Many of our followers are D.Y.I. musicians, so they are always interested in knowing if band members have formal musical backgrounds or if they are self-taught.

TB: Entirely self-taught. We were totally inspired by all that Raincoats, Kleenex, early Slits stuff. Plus Velvet Undeground, and The Shaggs, and Pere Ubu, and The Clean. All those bands showed what you could do with a couple of chords and a lot of imagination. More locally, bands like Pylon and The B-52’s made us thing you could be weirdo art kids with more inspiration than chops and have fun playing music.

HVUM: Fantastic! We’re absolutely into The Slits (Cut), The Raincoats, Kleenex/Liliput…Knocking on to the last question, we’d like to know how you found your HHBTM or was it that HHBTM found Tunabunny?

TB: After a couple of shows, word got around town that there was this band called Tunabunny that was a cool fucking mess and someone told Mike (owner/ceo/whatever of HHBTM) that he needed to check it out. It took him a couple of tries because he kept showing up after we’d already finished playing (we pride ourselves on punctuality—plus the sooner the show’s over the sooner you can relax and party). Anyway, he signed us right there on the spot. Said he’d never make us stars but he’d let us record whatever we wanted, which is all we could’ve asked for. And we kind of got to become stars anyway—distant stars that you can only see when the planets and atmosphere are properly aligned, but still stars nonetheless. We’ve certainly gone further than we ever expected or dreamed when we started playing together.

HVUM: Your music covers a very large bandwidth of genres from pop to blazing rock and it seems just to say that much of what you do is experimental. Do you have any influences that motivate you or is it more about an independent convergence of creative minds?

TB: The music usually emerges from us playing in a room. Because we listen to and love all kinds of music—from Abba to Sun Ra, from Swell Maps to The Beatles, we don’t put up boundaries around what we can or can’t play. Someone in the band shouts That’s great! Play that again! And a song comes out of it. Given that we live in an age when we have practically the entire history of recorded music at our fingertips, it seems dishonest for a band in 2017 to sound like they’ve only ever heard one record in their entire collective lives. Maybe that’s a good marketing strategy, but it makes for really boring records. And as a band, the only goal we’ve ever had is to not being boring — to ourselves or to our audience.

HVUM: Your new release “PCP Alice in Wonderland Jr” is our pick out of new releases for 23 June. We had a hard time describing the album in the sense of “pinning it down”. We’d really like to know your thoughts on the twenty-eight track album as far as its being topical or thematic?

TB: It’s a concept album about how great we are (I’m half channeling Noel Gallagher and half serious when I say that). There seems to be a lot of politics on this one, personal and otherwise, and a lot of struggling to keep one’s emotional head above water. I hear a lot of ostracism, a sense of loneliness and loss and isolation in the lyrics, with the music kind of pushing back against that. Like the best music, it’s about dancing on the graves of your problems and fears.

HVUM: Let’s take time out for a look and listen to “Incinerate”, the second track on “PCP Alice in Wonderland”.

HVUM: We first learned about the band with the release of “Genius Fatigue” and we like that album…”Duchess For Nothing” gets put on repeat! Has there been any change in direction between “Genius Fatigue” and the new release?

TB: We recorded Genius Fatigue back when we were touring all the time, so it has that kind of attack you get from standing in front of an audience. Being at home more, you tend to pick up different instruments, play around with drum machines, electronics, recording techniques, etc. Plus, the first two albums were us learning to play. Genius Fatigue (third album) was us kind of mastering the form. The only thing to do at that point was unlearn—switching instruments, switching approaches, etc.

HVUM: If Tunabunny was a book, what would it be and why?

TB: That is such a great question…It’s probably going to take longer to answer than all the others combined. Maybe Guy Debord’s autobiography Panegyric. We’ll defer to the publisher’s description of it as a “tongue-in-cheek autobiography [that] mixes precision and pastiche in a whirlwind account of philosophy, exploit, and inebriation. Plus it was original bound in sandpaper so it would erode the covers of the books next to it and most people haven’t heard of it—just like Tunabunny.

HVUM: Finally, what is on the horizon for Tunabunny? Any tours ahead?

TB: We’ve toured a lot over the years—low-budget shoestring DIY touring, but there’s more obstacles now than there used to be. Brigette’s about a year away from finishing her PhD (if all goes according to plan), and there’s a 3-year-old baby bouncing around, and Mary Jane has a real grown-up job and mortgage. That’s not to say we’ll never tour again, but we’d probably need more money than we did in the past, which would mean we’d need to be more popular, something we have no control over. Most likely we’ll be a cult band that gets criminally ignored during our lifetime only to be besieged with offers 20 years from now when we’re cited as incredibly influential, etc. etc. assuming human life exists 20 years from now in any recognizable form of course.

HVUM: Hey! Thanks a lot for spending time to share your experience and thoughts about Tunabunny. We really hope that you can find the time (and the money) to keep going. Don’t hesitate to call on us if we can lend a hand going forward!


Sally_newsfeedSally Morgan wrote the book on contemporary vocal technique – literally. Sing Like You Speak™: Simply and Naturally. SLYS™ is specifically designed to restore the effortless vocal production that is natural to the human instrument making your singing powerful, joyful and free. Sally has been successfully training singers for more than 30 years.

Sally has helped her clients heal vocal damage, expand vocal range, land a Broadway show, record their own music and tour internationally without vocal fatigue or strain.

What is Your Vocal Warm Up Warming Up? Sally Morgan and Sing Like You Speak have some answers to that question.

Visit Sally at http://singlikeyouspeak.com and Facebook

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